Topical platelet-derived growth factor enhances wound closure in the absence of wound contraction: An experimental and clinical study

Amer A. Saba, Bruce M. Freedman, James W. Gaffield, Donald R. Mackay, H. Paul Ehrlich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on wound healing in animal and human models were investigated. Four 1-cm2 wounds were made on the dorsum of 3 rats. A 0.5-cm punch wound was made behind each ear of 4 patients. Half the wounds were treated daily with vehicle, controls, and the rest were treated with PDGF. Treated wounds closed faster than the controls (animals: 16 ± 3.2 days vs. 17.8 ± 2.17 days; p < 0.05) and (patients: 16 ± 0.67 days vs. 19.5 ± 0.33 days; p < 0.05). Biopsies were taken at day 20 for polarized light-Sirius red histological analysis. The granulation tissue of PDGF-treated wounds showed fine collagen fibers with weak birefringence, characteristic of immature granulation tissue, deposited throughout the healed wound site. Such a pattern indicates wound closure by reepithelialization and filling in with scar. Control wound biopsies showed a small area of immature granulation tissue surrounded by intact dermal thick collagen fibers with strong birefringence. Such a pattern indicates wound closure by wound contraction. This shows that PDGF enhances wound closure by reepithelialization and the prevention of wound contraction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-66
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of plastic surgery
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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Platelet-Derived Growth Factor
Wounds and Injuries
Granulation Tissue
Birefringence
Clinical Studies
Collagen
Biopsy
Wound Healing
Cicatrix
Ear
Animal Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

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abstract = "The effects of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on wound healing in animal and human models were investigated. Four 1-cm2 wounds were made on the dorsum of 3 rats. A 0.5-cm punch wound was made behind each ear of 4 patients. Half the wounds were treated daily with vehicle, controls, and the rest were treated with PDGF. Treated wounds closed faster than the controls (animals: 16 ± 3.2 days vs. 17.8 ± 2.17 days; p < 0.05) and (patients: 16 ± 0.67 days vs. 19.5 ± 0.33 days; p < 0.05). Biopsies were taken at day 20 for polarized light-Sirius red histological analysis. The granulation tissue of PDGF-treated wounds showed fine collagen fibers with weak birefringence, characteristic of immature granulation tissue, deposited throughout the healed wound site. Such a pattern indicates wound closure by reepithelialization and filling in with scar. Control wound biopsies showed a small area of immature granulation tissue surrounded by intact dermal thick collagen fibers with strong birefringence. Such a pattern indicates wound closure by wound contraction. This shows that PDGF enhances wound closure by reepithelialization and the prevention of wound contraction.",
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Topical platelet-derived growth factor enhances wound closure in the absence of wound contraction : An experimental and clinical study. / Saba, Amer A.; Freedman, Bruce M.; Gaffield, James W.; Mackay, Donald R.; Ehrlich, H. Paul.

In: Annals of plastic surgery, Vol. 49, No. 1, 01.01.2002, p. 62-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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