Tornadogenesis resulting from the transport of circulation by a downdraft: Idealized numerical simulations

Paul Markowski, Jerry M. Straka, Erik N. Rasmussen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Idealized numerical simulations are conducted in which an axisymmetric, moist, rotating updraft free of rain is initiated, after which a downdraft is imposed by precipitation loading. The experiments are designed to emulate a supercell updraft that has rotation aloft initially, followed by the formation of a downdraft and descent of a rain curtain on the rear flank. In the idealized simulations, the rain curtain and downdraft are annular, rather than hook-shaped, as is typically observed. The downdraft transports angular momentum, which is initially a maximum aloft and zero at the surface, toward the ground. Once reaching the ground, the circulation-rich air is converged beneath the updraft and a tornado develops. The intensity and longevity of the tornado depend on the thermodynamic characteristics of the angular momentum-transporting downdraft, which are sensitive to the ambient low-level relative humidity and precipitation character of the rain curtain. For large low-level relative humidity and a rain curtain having a relatively small precipitation concentration, the imposed downdraft is warmer than when the low-level relative humidity is small and the precipitation concentration of the rain curtain is large. The simulated tornadoes are stronger and longer-lived when the imposed downdrafts are relatively warm compared to when the downdrafts are relatively cold, owing to a larger amount of convergence of circulation-rich downdraft air. The results may explain some recent observations of the tendency for supercells to be tornadic when their rear-flank downdrafts are associated with relatively small temperature deficits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)795-823
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2003

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tornado
updraft
simulation
relative humidity
supercell
angular momentum
air
rain
thermodynamics
experiment
temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

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abstract = "Idealized numerical simulations are conducted in which an axisymmetric, moist, rotating updraft free of rain is initiated, after which a downdraft is imposed by precipitation loading. The experiments are designed to emulate a supercell updraft that has rotation aloft initially, followed by the formation of a downdraft and descent of a rain curtain on the rear flank. In the idealized simulations, the rain curtain and downdraft are annular, rather than hook-shaped, as is typically observed. The downdraft transports angular momentum, which is initially a maximum aloft and zero at the surface, toward the ground. Once reaching the ground, the circulation-rich air is converged beneath the updraft and a tornado develops. The intensity and longevity of the tornado depend on the thermodynamic characteristics of the angular momentum-transporting downdraft, which are sensitive to the ambient low-level relative humidity and precipitation character of the rain curtain. For large low-level relative humidity and a rain curtain having a relatively small precipitation concentration, the imposed downdraft is warmer than when the low-level relative humidity is small and the precipitation concentration of the rain curtain is large. The simulated tornadoes are stronger and longer-lived when the imposed downdrafts are relatively warm compared to when the downdrafts are relatively cold, owing to a larger amount of convergence of circulation-rich downdraft air. The results may explain some recent observations of the tendency for supercells to be tornadic when their rear-flank downdrafts are associated with relatively small temperature deficits.",
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Tornadogenesis resulting from the transport of circulation by a downdraft : Idealized numerical simulations. / Markowski, Paul; Straka, Jerry M.; Rasmussen, Erik N.

In: Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, Vol. 60, No. 6, 15.03.2003, p. 795-823.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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