Toward A General Understanding of Parity and War

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Questions about the relationship between power distribution and war have been a major focus of empirical research in international relations for decades. Thus far no consistent relationship has been uncovered at the systemic level. At the dyadic level of analysis, however, many independent studies suggest a relationship between power parity and war. One conceptual framework, power transition theory, is consistent with this evidence. However, power transition theory is unduly limited by an exclusive focus on the power and conflict relations of the very strongest of states. The present effort attempts to generalize power transition theory so that the power and conflict relations of minor powers can be included within its empirical domain. The extension involves the introduction of a Multiple Hierarchy Model. This multiple hierarchy model is discussed conceptually, empirical evaluations are reviewed, and its implications for a general understanding of power and conflict relations are assessed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-162
Number of pages20
JournalConflict Management and Peace Science
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Parity
international relations
empirical research
present
evaluation
evidence
Conceptual framework
Empirical evaluation
International relations
Empirical research
Levels of analysis
Power distribution

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

@article{972102f1fb164cfb9259a0927d27a603,
title = "Toward A General Understanding of Parity and War",
abstract = "Questions about the relationship between power distribution and war have been a major focus of empirical research in international relations for decades. Thus far no consistent relationship has been uncovered at the systemic level. At the dyadic level of analysis, however, many independent studies suggest a relationship between power parity and war. One conceptual framework, power transition theory, is consistent with this evidence. However, power transition theory is unduly limited by an exclusive focus on the power and conflict relations of the very strongest of states. The present effort attempts to generalize power transition theory so that the power and conflict relations of minor powers can be included within its empirical domain. The extension involves the introduction of a Multiple Hierarchy Model. This multiple hierarchy model is discussed conceptually, empirical evaluations are reviewed, and its implications for a general understanding of power and conflict relations are assessed.",
author = "Lemke, {Douglas William}",
year = "1995",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/073889429501400202",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "143--162",
journal = "Conflict Management and Peace Science",
issn = "0738-8942",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

Toward A General Understanding of Parity and War. / Lemke, Douglas William.

In: Conflict Management and Peace Science, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.01.1995, p. 143-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Toward A General Understanding of Parity and War

AU - Lemke, Douglas William

PY - 1995/1/1

Y1 - 1995/1/1

N2 - Questions about the relationship between power distribution and war have been a major focus of empirical research in international relations for decades. Thus far no consistent relationship has been uncovered at the systemic level. At the dyadic level of analysis, however, many independent studies suggest a relationship between power parity and war. One conceptual framework, power transition theory, is consistent with this evidence. However, power transition theory is unduly limited by an exclusive focus on the power and conflict relations of the very strongest of states. The present effort attempts to generalize power transition theory so that the power and conflict relations of minor powers can be included within its empirical domain. The extension involves the introduction of a Multiple Hierarchy Model. This multiple hierarchy model is discussed conceptually, empirical evaluations are reviewed, and its implications for a general understanding of power and conflict relations are assessed.

AB - Questions about the relationship between power distribution and war have been a major focus of empirical research in international relations for decades. Thus far no consistent relationship has been uncovered at the systemic level. At the dyadic level of analysis, however, many independent studies suggest a relationship between power parity and war. One conceptual framework, power transition theory, is consistent with this evidence. However, power transition theory is unduly limited by an exclusive focus on the power and conflict relations of the very strongest of states. The present effort attempts to generalize power transition theory so that the power and conflict relations of minor powers can be included within its empirical domain. The extension involves the introduction of a Multiple Hierarchy Model. This multiple hierarchy model is discussed conceptually, empirical evaluations are reviewed, and its implications for a general understanding of power and conflict relations are assessed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84970363732&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84970363732&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/073889429501400202

DO - 10.1177/073889429501400202

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84970363732

VL - 14

SP - 143

EP - 162

JO - Conflict Management and Peace Science

JF - Conflict Management and Peace Science

SN - 0738-8942

IS - 2

ER -