Toward a greater understanding of the cohabitation effect: Premarital cohabitation and marital communication

Catherine L. Cohan, Stacey Kleinbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goal of the present study was to examine the relationship between premarital cohabitation experience and marital communication in an effort to understand the robust finding known as the cohabitation effect, whereby couples who cohabit before marriage have greater marital instability than couples who do not cohabit. Observed marital problem solving and social support behavior were examined as a function of premarital cohabitation experience in a sample of 92 couples in the first 2 years of their first marriages. Spouses who cohabited before marriage demonstrated more negative and less positive problem solving and support behaviors compared to spouses who did not cohabit. Sociodemographic, intrapersonal, and interpersonal functioning variables did not account for the association between cohabitation experience and marital communication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-192
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 26 2002

Fingerprint

cohabitation
marriage
communication
spouse
experience
social support
Communication
Cohabitation
Marriage
Problem Solving

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Toward a greater understanding of the cohabitation effect : Premarital cohabitation and marital communication. / Cohan, Catherine L.; Kleinbaum, Stacey.

In: Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 64, No. 1, 26.08.2002, p. 180-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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