Towards a discursive theory of racial identity: The souls of black folk as a response to nineteenth-century biological determinism

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

This essay interprets W. E. B. Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk as a response to nineteenth-century racial science and the ideology of biological determinism. It argues that Souls inverts the racist claims of nineteenth-century science through direct analysis, a style that combines art and reason and makes a methodological shift from studying what Black is to studying what being Black means. Du Bois's critical practice in The Souls of Black Folk moved scholarship along with two conceptual innovations-the veil of race and double consciousness toward a discursive theory of race that foreshadowed cultural/minority studies and critical race theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-215
Number of pages23
JournalWestern Journal of Communication
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1999

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Towards a discursive theory of racial identity: The souls of black folk as a response to nineteenth-century biological determinism'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this