Towards adding a physiological substrate to ACT-R

Christopher L. Dancy, Frank E. Ritter, Keith Berry

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Connecting a physiological model to a cognitive architecture presents an attractive option to better simulate a wide range of human behavior. This connection should facilitate both the effects of physiology on cognition (e.g. hunger and decision-making), and the effects of cognition on physiology (e.g. autonomic responses to memory featuring particularly aversive stimuli). To add physiology to a cognitive architecture, it should be represented as a separate module or substrate. We present ACT-R φ (ACT-R Phi), a connection of the physiology simulation system HumMod (Hester et al, 2011) and the cognitive architecture ACT-R (Anderson, 2007) using an newly created ACT-R module. A model of the startle response and its consequent effects on cognition and physiology is presented to demonstrate an example use of the new substrate. This extended version of ACT-R allows a user to computationally realize theories involving cognition, physiology, and their interaction. This architecture has potential applications to training simulations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012
Pages75-82
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Event21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012 - Amelia Island, FL, United States
Duration: Mar 12 2012Mar 15 2012

Publication series

Name21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012

Other

Other21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012
CountryUnited States
CityAmelia Island, FL
Period3/12/123/15/12

Fingerprint

Physiology
Substrate
Cognition
Cognitive Architecture
Substrates
Physiological models
Physiological Model
Simulation Training
Module
Human Behavior
Simulation System
Decision making
Decision Making
Data storage equipment
Interaction
Range of data
Demonstrate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

Dancy, C. L., Ritter, F. E., & Berry, K. (2012). Towards adding a physiological substrate to ACT-R. In 21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012 (pp. 75-82). (21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012).
Dancy, Christopher L. ; Ritter, Frank E. ; Berry, Keith. / Towards adding a physiological substrate to ACT-R. 21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012. 2012. pp. 75-82 (21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012).
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Dancy, CL, Ritter, FE & Berry, K 2012, Towards adding a physiological substrate to ACT-R. in 21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012. 21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012, pp. 75-82, 21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012, Amelia Island, FL, United States, 3/12/12.

Towards adding a physiological substrate to ACT-R. / Dancy, Christopher L.; Ritter, Frank E.; Berry, Keith.

21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012. 2012. p. 75-82 (21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Dancy CL, Ritter FE, Berry K. Towards adding a physiological substrate to ACT-R. In 21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012. 2012. p. 75-82. (21st Annual Conference on Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation 2012, BRiMS 2012).