Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis spore and crystal protein to resistant diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella)

Juliet D. Tang, Anthony M. Shelton, Jeroen Van Rie, Sandra De Roeck, William J. Moar, Richard T. Roush, Marnix Peferoen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

94 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A colony of Plutella xylostella from crucifer fields in Florida was used in mortality bioassays with HD-1 spore, CryIA(a), CryIA(b), CryIA(c), CryIB, CryIC, CryID, CryIE, or CryIIA. The data revealed high levels of field- evolved resistance to HD-1 spore and all CryIA pentoxins and no resistance to CryIB, CryIC, or CryID. CryIE and CryIIA were essentially nut toxic. When HD- 1 spore was combined 1:1 with protoxin and fed to susceptible larvae, spore synergized the activity of CryIA and CryIC 5- to 8-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively, and did not synergize the mortality of CryIIA. When fed to Florida larvae, spore failed to synergize the activity of all three CryIA protoxins, synergized the activity of CryIC 5.3-fold, and did not synergize the mortality for CryIIA. Binding studies with CryIA(b), CryIB, and CryIC were performed to determine possible mechanisms of resistance. The two techniques used were (i) binding of biotinylated toxin to tissue sections larval midguts and (ii) binding of biotinylated toxin to brush border membrane vesicles prepared from whole larvae. Both showed dramatically reduced binding of CryIA(b) in resistant larvae compared with that in susceptible larvae but no differences in binding of CryIB or CryIC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)564-569
Number of pages6
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume62
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 1996

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crystal proteins
Moths
Plutella xylostella
Spores
Bacillus thuringiensis
moth
Larva
spore
spores
crystal
toxicity
larva
protein
larvae
fold
mortality
toxin
Mortality
toxins
brush border membrane vesicles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Tang, J. D., Shelton, A. M., Van Rie, J., De Roeck, S., Moar, W. J., Roush, R. T., & Peferoen, M. (1996). Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis spore and crystal protein to resistant diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella). Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 62(2), 564-569.
Tang, Juliet D. ; Shelton, Anthony M. ; Van Rie, Jeroen ; De Roeck, Sandra ; Moar, William J. ; Roush, Richard T. ; Peferoen, Marnix. / Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis spore and crystal protein to resistant diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella). In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 1996 ; Vol. 62, No. 2. pp. 564-569.
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abstract = "A colony of Plutella xylostella from crucifer fields in Florida was used in mortality bioassays with HD-1 spore, CryIA(a), CryIA(b), CryIA(c), CryIB, CryIC, CryID, CryIE, or CryIIA. The data revealed high levels of field- evolved resistance to HD-1 spore and all CryIA pentoxins and no resistance to CryIB, CryIC, or CryID. CryIE and CryIIA were essentially nut toxic. When HD- 1 spore was combined 1:1 with protoxin and fed to susceptible larvae, spore synergized the activity of CryIA and CryIC 5- to 8-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively, and did not synergize the mortality of CryIIA. When fed to Florida larvae, spore failed to synergize the activity of all three CryIA protoxins, synergized the activity of CryIC 5.3-fold, and did not synergize the mortality for CryIIA. Binding studies with CryIA(b), CryIB, and CryIC were performed to determine possible mechanisms of resistance. The two techniques used were (i) binding of biotinylated toxin to tissue sections larval midguts and (ii) binding of biotinylated toxin to brush border membrane vesicles prepared from whole larvae. Both showed dramatically reduced binding of CryIA(b) in resistant larvae compared with that in susceptible larvae but no differences in binding of CryIB or CryIC.",
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Tang, JD, Shelton, AM, Van Rie, J, De Roeck, S, Moar, WJ, Roush, RT & Peferoen, M 1996, 'Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis spore and crystal protein to resistant diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella)', Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol. 62, no. 2, pp. 564-569.

Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis spore and crystal protein to resistant diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella). / Tang, Juliet D.; Shelton, Anthony M.; Van Rie, Jeroen; De Roeck, Sandra; Moar, William J.; Roush, Richard T.; Peferoen, Marnix.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 62, No. 2, 01.02.1996, p. 564-569.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis spore and crystal protein to resistant diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella)

AU - Tang, Juliet D.

AU - Shelton, Anthony M.

AU - Van Rie, Jeroen

AU - De Roeck, Sandra

AU - Moar, William J.

AU - Roush, Richard T.

AU - Peferoen, Marnix

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N2 - A colony of Plutella xylostella from crucifer fields in Florida was used in mortality bioassays with HD-1 spore, CryIA(a), CryIA(b), CryIA(c), CryIB, CryIC, CryID, CryIE, or CryIIA. The data revealed high levels of field- evolved resistance to HD-1 spore and all CryIA pentoxins and no resistance to CryIB, CryIC, or CryID. CryIE and CryIIA were essentially nut toxic. When HD- 1 spore was combined 1:1 with protoxin and fed to susceptible larvae, spore synergized the activity of CryIA and CryIC 5- to 8-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively, and did not synergize the mortality of CryIIA. When fed to Florida larvae, spore failed to synergize the activity of all three CryIA protoxins, synergized the activity of CryIC 5.3-fold, and did not synergize the mortality for CryIIA. Binding studies with CryIA(b), CryIB, and CryIC were performed to determine possible mechanisms of resistance. The two techniques used were (i) binding of biotinylated toxin to tissue sections larval midguts and (ii) binding of biotinylated toxin to brush border membrane vesicles prepared from whole larvae. Both showed dramatically reduced binding of CryIA(b) in resistant larvae compared with that in susceptible larvae but no differences in binding of CryIB or CryIC.

AB - A colony of Plutella xylostella from crucifer fields in Florida was used in mortality bioassays with HD-1 spore, CryIA(a), CryIA(b), CryIA(c), CryIB, CryIC, CryID, CryIE, or CryIIA. The data revealed high levels of field- evolved resistance to HD-1 spore and all CryIA pentoxins and no resistance to CryIB, CryIC, or CryID. CryIE and CryIIA were essentially nut toxic. When HD- 1 spore was combined 1:1 with protoxin and fed to susceptible larvae, spore synergized the activity of CryIA and CryIC 5- to 8-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively, and did not synergize the mortality of CryIIA. When fed to Florida larvae, spore failed to synergize the activity of all three CryIA protoxins, synergized the activity of CryIC 5.3-fold, and did not synergize the mortality for CryIIA. Binding studies with CryIA(b), CryIB, and CryIC were performed to determine possible mechanisms of resistance. The two techniques used were (i) binding of biotinylated toxin to tissue sections larval midguts and (ii) binding of biotinylated toxin to brush border membrane vesicles prepared from whole larvae. Both showed dramatically reduced binding of CryIA(b) in resistant larvae compared with that in susceptible larvae but no differences in binding of CryIB or CryIC.

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