Toxoplasma gondii, sex and premature rejection

Stuart A. West, Sarah E. Reece, Andrew Fraser Read

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adaptive sex ratio theory explains why gametocyte sex ratios are female-biased in many populations of apicomplexan parasites such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Recently, Ferguson has criticized this framework and proposed two alternative explanations - one for vector-borne parasites (e.g. Plasmodium) and one for Toxoplasma. Ferguson raises some interesting issues that certainly deserve more empirical attention. However, it should be pointed out that: (1) there are theoretical and empirical problems for his alternative hypotheses; and (2) existing empirical data support the application of sex ratio theory to these parasites, not its rejection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-157
Number of pages3
JournalTrends in Parasitology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003

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Sex Ratio
Toxoplasma
Parasites
Plasmodium
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

West, Stuart A. ; Reece, Sarah E. ; Read, Andrew Fraser. / Toxoplasma gondii, sex and premature rejection. In: Trends in Parasitology. 2003 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 155-157.
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Toxoplasma gondii, sex and premature rejection. / West, Stuart A.; Reece, Sarah E.; Read, Andrew Fraser.

In: Trends in Parasitology, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.04.2003, p. 155-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

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