Training graduate students at Penn State University in teaching statistics

W. L. Harkness, James Landis Rosenberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The undergraduate instructional program in statistics at Penn State is greatly affected by the availability of resources. Enrollments are very high for introductory courses, resulting in a need to find ways to handle classes with large numbers of students while at the same time trying to incorporate the pedagogical techniques now widely recognized in the educational community and described in Moore's Introduction. This in turn impacts the teacher training program we have put in place for our teaching assistants (TAs). We discuss TA training in teaching statistics for our institutional setting, taking into account our instructional goals, the background of TAs and the resources at our disposal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-13
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Statistician
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2005

Fingerprint

Teaching Statistics
Resources
Availability
Statistics
Teaching
Training
Graduate students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Statistics and Probability
  • Mathematics(all)
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty

Cite this

Harkness, W. L. ; Rosenberger, James Landis. / Training graduate students at Penn State University in teaching statistics. In: American Statistician. 2005 ; Vol. 59, No. 1. pp. 11-13.
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Training graduate students at Penn State University in teaching statistics. / Harkness, W. L.; Rosenberger, James Landis.

In: American Statistician, Vol. 59, No. 1, 01.02.2005, p. 11-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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