Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics

Meghan N. Graham, Jacob L. Graham

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We have seen significant change in the study and practice of human reasoning in recent years from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. Ubiquitous communication coupled with advances in computing and a plethora of analytic support tools have created a push for instantaneous reporting and analysis. This notion is particularly prevalent in law enforcement, emergency services and the intelligence community (IC), where commanders (and their civilian leadership) expect not only a birds' eye view of operations as they occur, but a play-by-play analysis of operational effectiveness. This paper explores the use of Red Cell Analytics (RCA) as pedagogy to train the next-gen analyst. A group of Penn State students in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at the University Park campus of The Pennsylvania State University have been practicing Red Team Analysis since 2008. RCA draws heavily from the military application of the same concept, except student RCA problems are typically on non-military in nature. RCA students utilize a suite of analytic tools and methods to explore and develop red-cell tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs), and apply their tradecraft across a broad threat spectrum, from student-life issues to threats to national security. The strength of RCA is not always realized by the solution but by the exploration of the analytic pathway. This paper describes the concept and use of red cell analytics to teach and promote the use of structured analytic techniques, analytic writing and critical thinking in the area of security and risk and intelligence training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNext-Generation Analyst IV
EditorsBarbara D. Broome, Timothy P. Hanratty, James Llinas, David L. Hall
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Electronic)9781510600928
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
EventNext-Generation Analyst IV - Baltimore, United States
Duration: Apr 18 2016Apr 19 2016

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume9851
ISSN (Print)0277-786X
ISSN (Electronic)1996-756X

Other

OtherNext-Generation Analyst IV
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore
Period4/18/164/19/16

Fingerprint

students
education
Cells
Students
intelligence
Cell
tactics
Emergency services
leadership
Information science
Military applications
National security
emergencies
Law enforcement
Information technology
communication
Training
Communication
Critical Thinking
cells

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Graham, M. N., & Graham, J. L. (2016). Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics. In B. D. Broome, T. P. Hanratty, J. Llinas, & D. L. Hall (Eds.), Next-Generation Analyst IV [98510D] (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 9851). SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2224077
Graham, Meghan N. ; Graham, Jacob L. / Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics. Next-Generation Analyst IV. editor / Barbara D. Broome ; Timothy P. Hanratty ; James Llinas ; David L. Hall. SPIE, 2016. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering).
@inproceedings{6e5ee8ec1618466d9bbaa781571d80bf,
title = "Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics",
abstract = "We have seen significant change in the study and practice of human reasoning in recent years from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. Ubiquitous communication coupled with advances in computing and a plethora of analytic support tools have created a push for instantaneous reporting and analysis. This notion is particularly prevalent in law enforcement, emergency services and the intelligence community (IC), where commanders (and their civilian leadership) expect not only a birds' eye view of operations as they occur, but a play-by-play analysis of operational effectiveness. This paper explores the use of Red Cell Analytics (RCA) as pedagogy to train the next-gen analyst. A group of Penn State students in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at the University Park campus of The Pennsylvania State University have been practicing Red Team Analysis since 2008. RCA draws heavily from the military application of the same concept, except student RCA problems are typically on non-military in nature. RCA students utilize a suite of analytic tools and methods to explore and develop red-cell tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs), and apply their tradecraft across a broad threat spectrum, from student-life issues to threats to national security. The strength of RCA is not always realized by the solution but by the exploration of the analytic pathway. This paper describes the concept and use of red cell analytics to teach and promote the use of structured analytic techniques, analytic writing and critical thinking in the area of security and risk and intelligence training.",
author = "Graham, {Meghan N.} and Graham, {Jacob L.}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1117/12.2224077",
language = "English (US)",
series = "Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering",
publisher = "SPIE",
editor = "Broome, {Barbara D.} and Hanratty, {Timothy P.} and James Llinas and Hall, {David L.}",
booktitle = "Next-Generation Analyst IV",
address = "United States",

}

Graham, MN & Graham, JL 2016, Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics. in BD Broome, TP Hanratty, J Llinas & DL Hall (eds), Next-Generation Analyst IV., 98510D, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 9851, SPIE, Next-Generation Analyst IV, Baltimore, United States, 4/18/16. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2224077

Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics. / Graham, Meghan N.; Graham, Jacob L.

Next-Generation Analyst IV. ed. / Barbara D. Broome; Timothy P. Hanratty; James Llinas; David L. Hall. SPIE, 2016. 98510D (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 9851).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics

AU - Graham, Meghan N.

AU - Graham, Jacob L.

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - We have seen significant change in the study and practice of human reasoning in recent years from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. Ubiquitous communication coupled with advances in computing and a plethora of analytic support tools have created a push for instantaneous reporting and analysis. This notion is particularly prevalent in law enforcement, emergency services and the intelligence community (IC), where commanders (and their civilian leadership) expect not only a birds' eye view of operations as they occur, but a play-by-play analysis of operational effectiveness. This paper explores the use of Red Cell Analytics (RCA) as pedagogy to train the next-gen analyst. A group of Penn State students in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at the University Park campus of The Pennsylvania State University have been practicing Red Team Analysis since 2008. RCA draws heavily from the military application of the same concept, except student RCA problems are typically on non-military in nature. RCA students utilize a suite of analytic tools and methods to explore and develop red-cell tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs), and apply their tradecraft across a broad threat spectrum, from student-life issues to threats to national security. The strength of RCA is not always realized by the solution but by the exploration of the analytic pathway. This paper describes the concept and use of red cell analytics to teach and promote the use of structured analytic techniques, analytic writing and critical thinking in the area of security and risk and intelligence training.

AB - We have seen significant change in the study and practice of human reasoning in recent years from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. Ubiquitous communication coupled with advances in computing and a plethora of analytic support tools have created a push for instantaneous reporting and analysis. This notion is particularly prevalent in law enforcement, emergency services and the intelligence community (IC), where commanders (and their civilian leadership) expect not only a birds' eye view of operations as they occur, but a play-by-play analysis of operational effectiveness. This paper explores the use of Red Cell Analytics (RCA) as pedagogy to train the next-gen analyst. A group of Penn State students in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at the University Park campus of The Pennsylvania State University have been practicing Red Team Analysis since 2008. RCA draws heavily from the military application of the same concept, except student RCA problems are typically on non-military in nature. RCA students utilize a suite of analytic tools and methods to explore and develop red-cell tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs), and apply their tradecraft across a broad threat spectrum, from student-life issues to threats to national security. The strength of RCA is not always realized by the solution but by the exploration of the analytic pathway. This paper describes the concept and use of red cell analytics to teach and promote the use of structured analytic techniques, analytic writing and critical thinking in the area of security and risk and intelligence training.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84989278465&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84989278465&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1117/12.2224077

DO - 10.1117/12.2224077

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84989278465

T3 - Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

BT - Next-Generation Analyst IV

A2 - Broome, Barbara D.

A2 - Hanratty, Timothy P.

A2 - Llinas, James

A2 - Hall, David L.

PB - SPIE

ER -

Graham MN, Graham JL. Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics. In Broome BD, Hanratty TP, Llinas J, Hall DL, editors, Next-Generation Analyst IV. SPIE. 2016. 98510D. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2224077