Transient reduction of cerebral blood flow leads to longlasting increase in GABA content in vulnerable structures and decreased susceptibility to bicuculline induced seizures

M. Sieklucka, C. Heim, F. Block, K. H. Sontag

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rats were exposed for 24 min to bilateral clamping of the common carotid arteries (BCCA) in pentobarbital anaesthesia. The GABA content was measured 24 hours, 48 hours, 4 days, 14 days and 3 months after BCCA. In other groups of rats seizures were elicited by i.p. injection of (+)-bicuculline (3 mg/kg) 24 hours, 48 hours, 4 days, 14 days and 3 months after BCCA. Analysis of the GABA content revealed significant increase compared with controls in the hippocampus, frontal cortex and substantia nigra from 24 hours up to 3 months. Bicuculline treatment induced tonic/clonic seizures and status epilepticus in sham operated animals; these effects were drastically diminished at various time points after BCCA. The present results suggest that BCCA produces a longlasting increase in GABA content and as a consequence protection from bicuculline-induced seizures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-94
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neural Transmission
Volume88
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1992

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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