Translation ecologies

A Beginner's guide

Thomas Oliver Beebee, Dawn Childress, Sean Weidman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article applies basic concepts of ecology to the cultural environments of literary translation, arguing that the duality of source-target twin texts should be considered within contexts corresponding to the different cultural systems of increasing complexity that are nested within one another: populations, communities, ecosystems, and biomes. The ecological-systemic approach to translation combines polysystem theory with social network analysis and the possibility that a digital humanities accounting of metadata signaling the overall environment for translation in the US may provide insight. The article ends with a discussion of the authors' current project to make a Big Data approach to translation operative.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalInterdisciplinary Studies of Literature
Volume1
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Ecology
Beginners
Systemic Approach
Social Network Analysis
Duality
Cultural Environment
Literary Translation
Polysystem
Metadata
Ecosystem

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

Beebee, Thomas Oliver ; Childress, Dawn ; Weidman, Sean. / Translation ecologies : A Beginner's guide. In: Interdisciplinary Studies of Literature. 2017 ; Vol. 1, No. 4. pp. 1-14.
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Beebee, TO, Childress, D & Weidman, S 2017, 'Translation ecologies: A Beginner's guide', Interdisciplinary Studies of Literature, vol. 1, no. 4, pp. 1-14.

Translation ecologies : A Beginner's guide. / Beebee, Thomas Oliver; Childress, Dawn; Weidman, Sean.

In: Interdisciplinary Studies of Literature, Vol. 1, No. 4, 01.12.2017, p. 1-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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