TRANSMISSION OF WATER THROUGH A BIOCOMPATIBLE POLYURETHANE - APPLICATION TO CIRCULATORY ASSIST DEVICES.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Segmented polyurethane is one of the most widely used biomedical polymers for the blood contacting surface of both the total artificial heart (TAH), and left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Dispite excellent mechanical and surface characteristics, the high water permeability of this material has been criticized by several investigators. In order to precisely and continuously measure the water transmission through a polyurethane membrane, the authors designed a special diffusion cell and permeability system that simulated conditions at the blood-polyurethane interface. This system provided precise control of membrane boundary conditions and allowed calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient by the lag time method.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTransactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials in conjunction with the Interna
PublisherSoc for Biomaterials
Pages56
Number of pages1
Volume8
StatePublished - 1985

Fingerprint

Polyurethanes
Water
Blood
Left ventricular assist devices
Artificial heart
Membranes
Polymers
Boundary conditions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Reid, J., Rosenberg, G., & Pierce, W. S. (1985). TRANSMISSION OF WATER THROUGH A BIOCOMPATIBLE POLYURETHANE - APPLICATION TO CIRCULATORY ASSIST DEVICES. In Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials in conjunction with the Interna (Vol. 8, pp. 56). Soc for Biomaterials.
Reid, John ; Rosenberg, Gerson ; Pierce, W. S. / TRANSMISSION OF WATER THROUGH A BIOCOMPATIBLE POLYURETHANE - APPLICATION TO CIRCULATORY ASSIST DEVICES. Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials in conjunction with the Interna. Vol. 8 Soc for Biomaterials, 1985. pp. 56
@inproceedings{3668736d1b6f445d9eb13283e84567cc,
title = "TRANSMISSION OF WATER THROUGH A BIOCOMPATIBLE POLYURETHANE - APPLICATION TO CIRCULATORY ASSIST DEVICES.",
abstract = "Segmented polyurethane is one of the most widely used biomedical polymers for the blood contacting surface of both the total artificial heart (TAH), and left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Dispite excellent mechanical and surface characteristics, the high water permeability of this material has been criticized by several investigators. In order to precisely and continuously measure the water transmission through a polyurethane membrane, the authors designed a special diffusion cell and permeability system that simulated conditions at the blood-polyurethane interface. This system provided precise control of membrane boundary conditions and allowed calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient by the lag time method.",
author = "John Reid and Gerson Rosenberg and Pierce, {W. S.}",
year = "1985",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "56",
booktitle = "Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials in conjunction with the Interna",
publisher = "Soc for Biomaterials",

}

Reid, J, Rosenberg, G & Pierce, WS 1985, TRANSMISSION OF WATER THROUGH A BIOCOMPATIBLE POLYURETHANE - APPLICATION TO CIRCULATORY ASSIST DEVICES. in Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials in conjunction with the Interna. vol. 8, Soc for Biomaterials, pp. 56.

TRANSMISSION OF WATER THROUGH A BIOCOMPATIBLE POLYURETHANE - APPLICATION TO CIRCULATORY ASSIST DEVICES. / Reid, John; Rosenberg, Gerson; Pierce, W. S.

Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials in conjunction with the Interna. Vol. 8 Soc for Biomaterials, 1985. p. 56.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - TRANSMISSION OF WATER THROUGH A BIOCOMPATIBLE POLYURETHANE - APPLICATION TO CIRCULATORY ASSIST DEVICES.

AU - Reid, John

AU - Rosenberg, Gerson

AU - Pierce, W. S.

PY - 1985

Y1 - 1985

N2 - Segmented polyurethane is one of the most widely used biomedical polymers for the blood contacting surface of both the total artificial heart (TAH), and left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Dispite excellent mechanical and surface characteristics, the high water permeability of this material has been criticized by several investigators. In order to precisely and continuously measure the water transmission through a polyurethane membrane, the authors designed a special diffusion cell and permeability system that simulated conditions at the blood-polyurethane interface. This system provided precise control of membrane boundary conditions and allowed calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient by the lag time method.

AB - Segmented polyurethane is one of the most widely used biomedical polymers for the blood contacting surface of both the total artificial heart (TAH), and left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Dispite excellent mechanical and surface characteristics, the high water permeability of this material has been criticized by several investigators. In order to precisely and continuously measure the water transmission through a polyurethane membrane, the authors designed a special diffusion cell and permeability system that simulated conditions at the blood-polyurethane interface. This system provided precise control of membrane boundary conditions and allowed calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient by the lag time method.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022275401&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022275401&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:0022275401

VL - 8

SP - 56

BT - Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials in conjunction with the Interna

PB - Soc for Biomaterials

ER -

Reid J, Rosenberg G, Pierce WS. TRANSMISSION OF WATER THROUGH A BIOCOMPATIBLE POLYURETHANE - APPLICATION TO CIRCULATORY ASSIST DEVICES. In Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials in conjunction with the Interna. Vol. 8. Soc for Biomaterials. 1985. p. 56