Transmission traits of malaria parasites within the mosquito: Genetic variation, phenotypic plasticity, and consequences for control

Thierry Lefevre, Johanna Ohm, Kounbobr R. Dabiré, Anna Cohuet, Marc Choisy, Matthew B. Thomas, Lauren Cator

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evaluating the risk of emergence and transmission of vector-borne diseases requires knowledge of the genetic and environmental contributions to pathogen transmission traits. Compared to the significant effort devoted to understanding the biology of malaria transmission from vertebrate hosts to mosquito vectors, the strategies that malaria parasites have evolved to maximize transmission from vectors to vertebrate hosts have been largely overlooked. While determinants of infection success within the mosquito host have recently received attention, the causes of variability for other key transmission traits of malaria, namely the duration of parasite development and its virulence within the vector, as well as its ability to alter mosquito behavior, remain largely unknown. This important gap in our knowledge needs to be bridged in order to obtain an integrative view of the ecology and evolution of malaria transmission strategies. Associations between transmission traits also need to be characterized, as they trade-offs and constraints could have important implications for understanding the evolution of parasite transmission. Finally, theoretical studies are required to evaluate how genetic and environmental influences on parasite transmission traits can shape malaria dynamics and evolution in response to disease control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)456-469
Number of pages14
JournalEvolutionary Applications
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2018

Fingerprint

malaria
phenotypic plasticity
Culicidae
mosquito
Malaria
genetic variation
parasite
Parasites
parasites
parasite transmission
Vertebrates
vertebrate
vertebrates
Disease Vectors
vector-borne diseases
Infectious Disease Transmission
disease control
virulence
Ecology
theoretical study

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Lefevre, Thierry ; Ohm, Johanna ; Dabiré, Kounbobr R. ; Cohuet, Anna ; Choisy, Marc ; Thomas, Matthew B. ; Cator, Lauren. / Transmission traits of malaria parasites within the mosquito : Genetic variation, phenotypic plasticity, and consequences for control. In: Evolutionary Applications. 2018 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 456-469.
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Transmission traits of malaria parasites within the mosquito : Genetic variation, phenotypic plasticity, and consequences for control. / Lefevre, Thierry; Ohm, Johanna; Dabiré, Kounbobr R.; Cohuet, Anna; Choisy, Marc; Thomas, Matthew B.; Cator, Lauren.

In: Evolutionary Applications, Vol. 11, No. 4, 04.2018, p. 456-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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