Transparent mullite ceramics from diphasic aerogels by microwave and conventional processings

Y. Fang, R. Roy, Dinesh Kumar Agrawal, D. M. Roy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transparent mullite ceramics were developed by both microwave and conventional sintering of compacts starting with a diphasic aerogel near 1300°C. Both sintering processes were carried out in air at ambient pressure. The conventionally sintered sample was essentially non-crystalline, whereas the microwave sintered sample was highly crystalline mullite. Using a xerogel of the sane conposition, no transparency was achieved under the same conditions. The results indicate that the agglomeration-free microstructure of the starting aerogel was the key for achieving the transparency. The achievement of transparent mullite ceramics by microwave processing is attributed to the rapid-heating, accelerated-mullitization, enhanced densification, and limited grain-growth of the diphasic mullite gel in the microwave field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-15
Number of pages5
JournalMaterials Letters
Volume28
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Fingerprint

Aerogels
Mullite
aerogels
Microwaves
ceramics
microwaves
Processing
Transparency
sintering
Sintering
Xerogels
xerogels
densification
agglomeration
Grain growth
Densification
Gels
Agglomeration
gels
Crystalline materials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Fang, Y. ; Roy, R. ; Agrawal, Dinesh Kumar ; Roy, D. M. / Transparent mullite ceramics from diphasic aerogels by microwave and conventional processings. In: Materials Letters. 1996 ; Vol. 28, No. 1-3. pp. 11-15.
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Transparent mullite ceramics from diphasic aerogels by microwave and conventional processings. / Fang, Y.; Roy, R.; Agrawal, Dinesh Kumar; Roy, D. M.

In: Materials Letters, Vol. 28, No. 1-3, 01.01.1996, p. 11-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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