Transplantation of liver grafts from older donors: Impact on recipients with hepatitis C virus infection

Ashokkumar Jain, M. Orloff, P. Abt, R. Kashyap, R. Mohanka, K. Lansing, A. Bozorgzadeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction. Older donor allografts are being accepted for liver transplantation (LTx) due to shortage of organs. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related disease is presently the most common indication of LT in the United States. We studied the impact of donor age on patient and graft survivals in patients with HCV infection. Patients and methods. One hundred fifty four consecutive HCV(+) LTx recipients (117 men, 37 women) were studied. The mean follow-up period was 41.0 ± 30.2 months. The population was divided into four groups according to donor age: group I (≤20 years); group II (21 to 40 years); group III (41 to 60 years); group IV (>60 years). Results. Thirty-two (20.8%) patients died during follow-up and 16 patients (10.4%) required retransplantation. The actuarial 7-year patient survivals for groups I, II, III, and IV were 87.1%, 73.7%, 69.3%, and 68.5%, respectively (P = .4). Patient survivals for donor age groups III + IV (n = 95) and groups I + II (n = 59) were 68.9% and 77.2%, respectively (P = .19). The 7-year graft survivals for groups I, II, III, and IV were 82.7%, 71.8%, 65.8%, and 62.5%, respectively (P = .17). Graft survivals for groups III + IV and groups I + II were 58.4% and 76.2%, respectively (P = .03). Conclusion. Patient and graft survivals for HCV-positive liver transplant recipients in this study decreased progressively as the donor age increased. Patient and graft survivals were best for group I recipients. There were significant differences in graft survivals when recipients wee grouped with a cutoff donor age of 40 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3162-3164
Number of pages3
JournalTransplantation proceedings
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

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Virus Diseases
Hepacivirus
Liver Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Graft Survival
Transplants
Age Groups
Survival
Allografts
Liver

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Jain, Ashokkumar ; Orloff, M. ; Abt, P. ; Kashyap, R. ; Mohanka, R. ; Lansing, K. ; Bozorgzadeh, A. / Transplantation of liver grafts from older donors : Impact on recipients with hepatitis C virus infection. In: Transplantation proceedings. 2005 ; Vol. 37, No. 7. pp. 3162-3164.
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abstract = "Introduction. Older donor allografts are being accepted for liver transplantation (LTx) due to shortage of organs. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related disease is presently the most common indication of LT in the United States. We studied the impact of donor age on patient and graft survivals in patients with HCV infection. Patients and methods. One hundred fifty four consecutive HCV(+) LTx recipients (117 men, 37 women) were studied. The mean follow-up period was 41.0 ± 30.2 months. The population was divided into four groups according to donor age: group I (≤20 years); group II (21 to 40 years); group III (41 to 60 years); group IV (>60 years). Results. Thirty-two (20.8{\%}) patients died during follow-up and 16 patients (10.4{\%}) required retransplantation. The actuarial 7-year patient survivals for groups I, II, III, and IV were 87.1{\%}, 73.7{\%}, 69.3{\%}, and 68.5{\%}, respectively (P = .4). Patient survivals for donor age groups III + IV (n = 95) and groups I + II (n = 59) were 68.9{\%} and 77.2{\%}, respectively (P = .19). The 7-year graft survivals for groups I, II, III, and IV were 82.7{\%}, 71.8{\%}, 65.8{\%}, and 62.5{\%}, respectively (P = .17). Graft survivals for groups III + IV and groups I + II were 58.4{\%} and 76.2{\%}, respectively (P = .03). Conclusion. Patient and graft survivals for HCV-positive liver transplant recipients in this study decreased progressively as the donor age increased. Patient and graft survivals were best for group I recipients. There were significant differences in graft survivals when recipients wee grouped with a cutoff donor age of 40 years.",
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Transplantation of liver grafts from older donors : Impact on recipients with hepatitis C virus infection. / Jain, Ashokkumar; Orloff, M.; Abt, P.; Kashyap, R.; Mohanka, R.; Lansing, K.; Bozorgzadeh, A.

In: Transplantation proceedings, Vol. 37, No. 7, 01.09.2005, p. 3162-3164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transplantation of liver grafts from older donors

T2 - Impact on recipients with hepatitis C virus infection

AU - Jain, Ashokkumar

AU - Orloff, M.

AU - Abt, P.

AU - Kashyap, R.

AU - Mohanka, R.

AU - Lansing, K.

AU - Bozorgzadeh, A.

PY - 2005/9/1

Y1 - 2005/9/1

N2 - Introduction. Older donor allografts are being accepted for liver transplantation (LTx) due to shortage of organs. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related disease is presently the most common indication of LT in the United States. We studied the impact of donor age on patient and graft survivals in patients with HCV infection. Patients and methods. One hundred fifty four consecutive HCV(+) LTx recipients (117 men, 37 women) were studied. The mean follow-up period was 41.0 ± 30.2 months. The population was divided into four groups according to donor age: group I (≤20 years); group II (21 to 40 years); group III (41 to 60 years); group IV (>60 years). Results. Thirty-two (20.8%) patients died during follow-up and 16 patients (10.4%) required retransplantation. The actuarial 7-year patient survivals for groups I, II, III, and IV were 87.1%, 73.7%, 69.3%, and 68.5%, respectively (P = .4). Patient survivals for donor age groups III + IV (n = 95) and groups I + II (n = 59) were 68.9% and 77.2%, respectively (P = .19). The 7-year graft survivals for groups I, II, III, and IV were 82.7%, 71.8%, 65.8%, and 62.5%, respectively (P = .17). Graft survivals for groups III + IV and groups I + II were 58.4% and 76.2%, respectively (P = .03). Conclusion. Patient and graft survivals for HCV-positive liver transplant recipients in this study decreased progressively as the donor age increased. Patient and graft survivals were best for group I recipients. There were significant differences in graft survivals when recipients wee grouped with a cutoff donor age of 40 years.

AB - Introduction. Older donor allografts are being accepted for liver transplantation (LTx) due to shortage of organs. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related disease is presently the most common indication of LT in the United States. We studied the impact of donor age on patient and graft survivals in patients with HCV infection. Patients and methods. One hundred fifty four consecutive HCV(+) LTx recipients (117 men, 37 women) were studied. The mean follow-up period was 41.0 ± 30.2 months. The population was divided into four groups according to donor age: group I (≤20 years); group II (21 to 40 years); group III (41 to 60 years); group IV (>60 years). Results. Thirty-two (20.8%) patients died during follow-up and 16 patients (10.4%) required retransplantation. The actuarial 7-year patient survivals for groups I, II, III, and IV were 87.1%, 73.7%, 69.3%, and 68.5%, respectively (P = .4). Patient survivals for donor age groups III + IV (n = 95) and groups I + II (n = 59) were 68.9% and 77.2%, respectively (P = .19). The 7-year graft survivals for groups I, II, III, and IV were 82.7%, 71.8%, 65.8%, and 62.5%, respectively (P = .17). Graft survivals for groups III + IV and groups I + II were 58.4% and 76.2%, respectively (P = .03). Conclusion. Patient and graft survivals for HCV-positive liver transplant recipients in this study decreased progressively as the donor age increased. Patient and graft survivals were best for group I recipients. There were significant differences in graft survivals when recipients wee grouped with a cutoff donor age of 40 years.

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