Traube-Rule Interpretation of Protein Adsorption at the Liquid-Vapor Interface

Anandi Krishnan, Christopher A. Siedlecki, Erwin A. Vogler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pendant-drop tensiometry of aqueous-buffer solutions of purified human proteins spanning nearly 3 orders of magnitude in molecular weight (MW) reveals that reduction in liquid-vapor (LV) interfacial tension γ lv followed a systematic progression in MW with the molar concentration required to reach a specified γ lv value decreasing with increasing MW in a manner reminiscent of the Traube rule for linear hydrocarbon surfactants. Furthermore, the concentration dependence of interfacial tension (dγ lv/d ln C B, where C B is bulk-solution concentration) is observed to be surprisingly invariant among this disparate group of proteins (i.e., approximately constant apparent Gibbs' surface excess Γ = -1/RT dγ lv/d ln C B). These findings are interpreted through a model of protein adsorption predicated on the interfacial packing of spherical molecules with dimensions scaling as a function of MW. The Traube-rule-like ordering is rationalized as a natural outcome of an invariant partition coefficient that entrains a fixed fraction of bulk-solution molecules within a LV interphase which thickens with increasing protein size (MW). Thus, protein adsorption follows a homology in molecular size rather than composition. Calibration of the sphere-packing model to previously reported neutron reflectometry of albumin adsorption permitted interpretation of tensiometric results in terms of interphase thickness and multilayering, predicting that relatively small proteins with MW < 125 kDa (e.g., albumin) fill a single layer whereas larger proteins with MW ∼ 1000 kDa (e.g., IgM) require up to five molecular layers to satisfy a constant partition coefficient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10342-10352
Number of pages11
JournalLangmuir
Volume19
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 25 2003

Fingerprint

liquid-vapor interfaces
molecular weight
Molecular weight
Vapors
proteins
Proteins
Adsorption
adsorption
Liquids
albumins
Surface tension
Albumins
partitions
interfacial tension
vapors
Molecules
homology
coefficients
liquids
Hydrocarbons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Spectroscopy
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Krishnan, Anandi ; Siedlecki, Christopher A. ; Vogler, Erwin A. / Traube-Rule Interpretation of Protein Adsorption at the Liquid-Vapor Interface. In: Langmuir. 2003 ; Vol. 19, No. 24. pp. 10342-10352.
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Traube-Rule Interpretation of Protein Adsorption at the Liquid-Vapor Interface. / Krishnan, Anandi; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Vogler, Erwin A.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 19, No. 24, 25.11.2003, p. 10342-10352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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