Trends in sexual orientation disparities in cigarette smoking: Intersections between race/ethnicity and sex

Jessica L. King, Lingpeng Shan, Sunday Azagba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cigarette smoking is disproportionately high among sexual minority populations, but it is unclear whether these disparities exist among race/ethnicity subgroups. This study examined trends in sexual orientation disparities in cigarette smoking by race/ethnicity. Data are from the 2014–2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (N = 1,194,768). Trend analyses compared cigarette smoking by race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, non-Hispanic other) and sexual orientation (straight, lesbian or gay, bisexual, something else/don't know/refused). Multivariable analyses examined associations between sexual orientation and cigarette use for each race/ethnicity, controlling for other sociodemographic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2019, lesbian or gay, and bisexual populations consistently had higher smoking rates than straight populations, which held across race/ethnicity. Among non-Hispanic White adults, lesbians (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.29, 1.76), bisexual females (OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.39, 1.75), gay (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.22, 1.55), and bisexual males (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.04, 1.43) had higher odds of smoking compared those self-identifying as straight. Among non-Hispanic Black adults, lesbians (OR = 1.90, 95% CI =1.33, 2.73) and bisexual females (OR = 1.85, 95% CI =1.42, 2.41) were more likely to currently smoke. Among Hispanic adults, those self-identifying as lesbian or gay (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.19, 2.09) or bisexual (OR = 2.40, 95% CI = 1.88, 3.07) were more likely to currently smoke, though the associations were not significant in Hispanic males. Disparities in cigarette smoking by race/ethnicity and sexual orientation suggest that aggregating these groups mask important differences and limit efforts to target those most at risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106760
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume153
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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