Trisomy 18 and Congenital Heart Disease: Single-Center Review of Outcomes and Parental Perspectives

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: In patients with trisomy 18, congenital heart surgery is controversial due to anticipated poor patient outcome. Data are lacking regarding clinical outcomes and family opinions about care received. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients with trisomy 18 and congenital heart disease from 2005 to 2017 was performed. Patients were grouped into those receiving cardiac intervention (surgery or cardiac catheterization) versus medical management. A telephone survey was used to assess completeness of family counseling provided prior to treatment selection and parental opinions on the care received. RESULTS: Seventeen infants were assessed. In the medical management group (n = 7), there were five deaths at a median age of 1.5 months (range: 1.2-4.1 months) and two survivors aged 29 and 44 months at latest follow-up. In the intervention group (n = 10), cardiac surgery was performed in nine patients at a median age of 4.3 months (0.2-23.4 months) and weight of 3.2 kg (1.5-12.2 kg); catheter intervention was performed in one patient at one week of age. At latest follow-up, seven intervention patients are alive at a median age of 50 months (5-91 months). Survey respondents (n = 12) unanimously stated that their child's quality of life was improved by their specific treatment strategy, that the experience of the parents was enhanced, and that they would choose the same treatment course again. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical repair may be associated with favorable early outcomes and may be judiciously offered in selected circumstances. In this limited experience, parental perceptions were positive regarding the quality of care and overall experience independent of the chosen treatment strategy or eventual outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)550-556
Number of pages7
JournalWorld journal for pediatric & congenital heart surgery
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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