Trust But Verify: Examining the Association Between Students' Sourcing Behaviors and Ratings of Text Trustworthiness

Alexandra List, Patricia A. Alexander, Lori A. Stephens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three indicators of undergraduate students' (n = 197) source evaluation were investigated as students completed an academic task requiring the use of multiple texts. The source evaluation metrics examined were students' (1) accessing of document information, (2) trustworthiness ratings, and (3) citation in written responses. All three indicators of source evaluation were found to differ across source type. Based on a significant interaction between source type and accessing of document information in predicting trustworthiness ratings, an additive model of trustworthiness evaluation is proposed. Specifically, we suggest that students access document information to confirm a priori, heuristic judgments of trustworthiness. A model using all three source evaluation metrics was found to be significant in predicting response quality, with the number of citations included in students' responses serving as the strongest predictor in the model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-104
Number of pages22
JournalDiscourse Processes
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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