Turbulent mixing and removal of ozone within an Amazon rainforest canopy

L. S. Freire, T. Gerken, J. Ruiz-Plancarte, D. Wei, J. D. Fuentes, G. G. Katul, N. L. Dias, O. C. Acevedo, M. Chamecki

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15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Simultaneous profiles of turbulence statistics and mean ozone mixing ratio are used to establish a relation between eddy diffusivity and ozone mixing within the Amazon forest. A one-dimensional diffusion model is proposed and used to infer mixing time scales from the eddy diffusivity profiles. Data and model results indicate that during daytime conditions, the upper (lower) half of the canopy is well (partially) mixed most of the time and that most of the vertical extent of the forest can be mixed in less than an hour. During nighttime, most of the canopy is predominantly poorly mixed, except for periods with bursts of intermittent turbulence. Even though turbulence is faster than chemistry during daytime, both processes have comparable time scales in the lower canopy layers during nighttime conditions. Nonchemical loss time scales (associated with stomatal uptake and dry deposition) for the entire forest are comparable to turbulent mixing time scale in the lower canopy during the day and in the entire canopy during the night, indicating a tight coupling between turbulent transport and dry deposition and stomatal uptake processes. Because of the significant time of day and height variability of the turbulent mixing time scale inside the canopy, it is important to take it into account when studying chemical and biophysical processes happening in the forest environment. The method proposed here to estimate turbulent mixing time scales is a reliable alternative to currently used models, especially for situations in which the vertical distribution of the time scale is relevant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2791-2811
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume122
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

Freire, L. S., Gerken, T., Ruiz-Plancarte, J., Wei, D., Fuentes, J. D., Katul, G. G., Dias, N. L., Acevedo, O. C., & Chamecki, M. (2017). Turbulent mixing and removal of ozone within an Amazon rainforest canopy. Journal of Geophysical Research, 122(5), 2791-2811. https://doi.org/10.1002/2016JD026009