Turn that racket down! Physical anhedonia and diminished pleasure from music

Emily C. Nusbaum, Paul J. Silvia, Roger Beaty, Chris J. Burgin, Thomas R. Kwapil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Why do some people not enjoy listening to music as much as others? Two studies explored whether people high in physical anhedonia - an aspect of schizotypy that is associated with reduced pleasure from physical stimuli - are less engaged in the musical world than other people. Study 1 examined individual differences in music engagement and experience. People with higher levels of physical anhedonia reported valuing music less, experiencing fewer aesthetic emotions in response to music, liking fewer genres of music, and having less music experience. Study 2 used experience sampling to examine how individual differences in physical anhedonia predicted music engagement, music listening habits, and the aesthetic experiences of music in everyday life. During a typical week, people with higher levels of physical anhedonia spent less time listening to music. Taken together, these results suggest that as physical anhedonia increases, people become increasingly detached from and disinterested in music.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)228-243
Number of pages16
JournalEmpirical Studies of the Arts
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Physical
Pleasure
Music
Individual Differences
Stimulus
Everyday Life
Emotion
Schizotypy
Habit
Aesthetic Experience
Aesthetics
Sampling
Music Listening

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Music
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

Nusbaum, Emily C. ; Silvia, Paul J. ; Beaty, Roger ; Burgin, Chris J. ; Kwapil, Thomas R. / Turn that racket down! Physical anhedonia and diminished pleasure from music. In: Empirical Studies of the Arts. 2015 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 228-243.
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Turn that racket down! Physical anhedonia and diminished pleasure from music. / Nusbaum, Emily C.; Silvia, Paul J.; Beaty, Roger; Burgin, Chris J.; Kwapil, Thomas R.

In: Empirical Studies of the Arts, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 228-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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