Twelfth-Grade Student Work Intensity Linked to Later Educational Attainment and Substance Use: New Longitudinal Evidence

Jerald G. Bachman, Jeremy Staff, Patrick M. O'Malley, John E. Schulenberg, Peter Freedman-Doan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long hours of paid employment during high school have been linked to a variety of problem behaviors, but questions remain about whether and to what extent work intensity makes any causal contribution. This study addresses those questions by focusing on how 12th-grade work intensity is associated with substance use and educational attainment in the years following high school. It uses 2 nationally representative longitudinal data sets from the Monitoring the Future project, spanning a total of 3 decades. One data set tracks 8th graders for 8 years (modal ages 14-22) and provides extensive controls for possible prior causes; the second, larger data set tracks 12th graders for up to 12 years (to modal ages 29-30) and permits assessment of possible short-term and longer term consequences. Findings based on propensity score matching and multivariate regression analyses are highly consistent across the 2 sets of data. All findings show that more fundamental prior problems, including low academic performance and aspirations, make substantial contributions to substance use and long-term academic attainment (selection effects), but the findings also suggest that high work intensity during high school has long-term costs in terms of college completion and perhaps cigarette use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-363
Number of pages20
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

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Students
evidence
student
school
Propensity Score
Tobacco Products
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
monitoring
Costs and Cost Analysis
regression
cause
Datasets
costs
performance
Aspirations (Psychology)
Problem Behavior

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Bachman, Jerald G. ; Staff, Jeremy ; O'Malley, Patrick M. ; Schulenberg, John E. ; Freedman-Doan, Peter. / Twelfth-Grade Student Work Intensity Linked to Later Educational Attainment and Substance Use : New Longitudinal Evidence. In: Developmental psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 47, No. 2. pp. 344-363.
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Twelfth-Grade Student Work Intensity Linked to Later Educational Attainment and Substance Use : New Longitudinal Evidence. / Bachman, Jerald G.; Staff, Jeremy; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Schulenberg, John E.; Freedman-Doan, Peter.

In: Developmental psychology, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.03.2011, p. 344-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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