Two approaches to determining the sea-to-air flux of dimethyl sulfide

satellite ocean color and a photochemical model with atmospheric measurements

A. M. Thompson, W. E. Esaias, R. L. Iverson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two estimates of the ocean-to-atmosphere flux of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) are presented to determine the feasibility of using remotely sensed data to map the marine sources of a photoreactive trace gas. First, an empirical relationship between chlorophyll a and DMS in surface seawater is used with NASA coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) data for chlorophyll a pigment to derive a mean DMS flux for a region in the tropical North Atlantic for October 1980. This is compared with the sea-to-air flux derived from a one-dimensional photochemical model. The applicability of the results to strategies for satellite remote sensing of the tropospheric sulfur cycle is discussed. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume95
Issue numberD12
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Fingerprint

dimethyl sulfide
extraterrestrial oceans
ocean color
sulfides
oceans
sulfide
Satellites
chlorophylls
Chlorophyll
Fluxes
Color
color
air
Coastal Zone Color Scanner
chlorophyll a
Air
chlorophyll
CZCS
sulfur cycle
scanners

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Forestry
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

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abstract = "Two estimates of the ocean-to-atmosphere flux of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) are presented to determine the feasibility of using remotely sensed data to map the marine sources of a photoreactive trace gas. First, an empirical relationship between chlorophyll a and DMS in surface seawater is used with NASA coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) data for chlorophyll a pigment to derive a mean DMS flux for a region in the tropical North Atlantic for October 1980. This is compared with the sea-to-air flux derived from a one-dimensional photochemical model. The applicability of the results to strategies for satellite remote sensing of the tropospheric sulfur cycle is discussed. -from Authors",
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Two approaches to determining the sea-to-air flux of dimethyl sulfide : satellite ocean color and a photochemical model with atmospheric measurements. / Thompson, A. M.; Esaias, W. E.; Iverson, R. L.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 95, No. D12, 01.01.1990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Two approaches to determining the sea-to-air flux of dimethyl sulfide

T2 - satellite ocean color and a photochemical model with atmospheric measurements

AU - Thompson, A. M.

AU - Esaias, W. E.

AU - Iverson, R. L.

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AB - Two estimates of the ocean-to-atmosphere flux of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) are presented to determine the feasibility of using remotely sensed data to map the marine sources of a photoreactive trace gas. First, an empirical relationship between chlorophyll a and DMS in surface seawater is used with NASA coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) data for chlorophyll a pigment to derive a mean DMS flux for a region in the tropical North Atlantic for October 1980. This is compared with the sea-to-air flux derived from a one-dimensional photochemical model. The applicability of the results to strategies for satellite remote sensing of the tropospheric sulfur cycle is discussed. -from Authors

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