Two approaches to determining the sea-to-air flux of dimethyl sulfide: satellite ocean color and a photochemical model with atmospheric measurements

A. M. Thompson, W. E. Esaias, R. L. Iverson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two estimates of the ocean-to-atmosphere flux of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) are presented to determine the feasibility of using remotely sensed data to map the marine sources of a photoreactive trace gas. First, an empirical relationship between chlorophyll a and DMS in surface seawater is used with NASA coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) data for chlorophyll a pigment to derive a mean DMS flux for a region in the tropical North Atlantic for October 1980. This is compared with the sea-to-air flux derived from a one-dimensional photochemical model. The applicability of the results to strategies for satellite remote sensing of the tropospheric sulfur cycle is discussed. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume95
Issue numberD12
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Forestry
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Palaeontology

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