Two general designs for fluidic batteries in paper-based microfluidic devices that provide predictable and tunable sources of power for on-chip assays

Nicole K. Thom, Gregory G. Lewis, Matthew J. Ditucci, Scott T. Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Microfluidic devices fabricated out of paper (and paper and tape) have emerged as promising platforms for conducting multiple diagnostic assays simultaneously in resource-limited settings. Certain types of assays in these devices, however, require a source of power to function. Lithium ion, nickel-cadmium, and other types of batteries have been used to power these devices, but these traditional batteries are too expensive and pose too much of a disposal hazard for diagnostic applications in resource-limited settings. To circumvent this problem, we previously designed a "fluidic battery" that is composed of multiple galvanic cells, incorporated directly into a multilayer paper-based microfluidic device. We now show that multiple cells of these fluidic batteries can be connected in series and/or in parallel in a predictable way to obtain desired values of current and potential, and that the batteries can be optimized to last for a short period of time (<1 min) or for up to 10-15 min. This paper also (i) outlines and quantifies the parameters that can be adjusted to maximize the current and potential of fluidic batteries, (ii) describes two general configurations for fluidic batteries, and (iii) provides equations that enable prediction of the current and potential that can be obtained when these two general designs are varied. This work provides the foundation upon which future applications of fluidic batteries will be based.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6888-6895
Number of pages8
JournalRSC Advances
Volume3
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - May 21 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

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