Type I MADS-box genes have experienced faster birth-and-death evolution than type II MADS-box genes in angiosperms

Jongmin Nam, Joonyul Kim, Shinyoung Lee, Gynheung An, Hong Ma, Masatoshi Nei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

150 Scopus citations

Abstract

Plant MADS-box genes form a large gene family for transcription factors and are involved in various aspects of developmental processes, including flower development. They are known to be subject to birth-and-death evolution, but the detailed features of this mode of evolution remain unclear. To have a deeper insight into the evolutionary pattern of this gene family, we enumerated all available functional and nonfunctional (pseudogene) MADS-box genes from the Arabidopsis and rice genomes. Plant MADS-box genes can be classified into types I and II genes on the basis of phylogenetic analysis. Conducting extensive homology search and phylogenetic analysis, we found 64 presumed functional and 37 nonfunctional type I genes and 43 presumed functional and 4 nonfunctional type II genes in Arabidopsis. We also found 24 presumed functional and 6 nonfunctional type I genes and 47 presumed functional and 1 nonfunctional type II genes in rice. Our phylogenetic analysis indicated there were at least about four to eight type I genes and ≈15-20 type II genes in the most recent common ancestor of Arabidopsis and rice. It has also been suggested that type I genes have experienced a higher rate of birth-and-death evolution than type II genes in angiosperms. Furthermore, the higher rate of birth-and-death evolution in type I genes appeared partly due to a higher frequency of segmental gene duplication and weaker purifying selection in type I than in type II genes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1910-1915
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume101
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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