Ultrafine particle emissions and decay rates due to burning candles in a residence

Lance Wallace, Su Gwang Jeong, Donghyun Rim

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A major source of human exposure to ultrafine particles is candle use. Recent studies indicate that candles produce most of their particles in the size range under 10 nm, with perhaps half of the particles less than 5 nm. Most studies have not explored this range, having been limited to sizes >7-20 nm. In this study, emission and decay rates are estimated for three types of candles: paraffin, soy, beeswax. Number, area, and mass distributions are provided for 93 particle sizes from 2.33 nm to 64 nm. Total particle production was in the range of 1013 min-1. A log-log linear relationship between decay rate (including coagulation, deposition, and air exchange rates) and particle size is found with 99% R2 over this entire range. The increased particle production for the very smallest particles (2.33-2.50 nm) suggests that even smaller particles may be important to study. Results will be useful for modeling human exposure to ultrafine particles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication15th Conference of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate, INDOOR AIR 2018
PublisherInternational Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate
ISBN (Electronic)9781713826514
StatePublished - 2018
Event15th Conference of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate, INDOOR AIR 2018 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Jul 22 2018Jul 27 2018

Publication series

Name15th Conference of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate, INDOOR AIR 2018

Conference

Conference15th Conference of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate, INDOOR AIR 2018
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period7/22/187/27/18

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pollution

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