Ultrafine particles: 3 Years of measurements in the NIST test house

Lance Wallace, Andrew Persily, Steven Emmerich, Donghyun Rim, Hoang Phuong Chi, Cynthia Howard-Reed, Wang Fang, Michal Green, Jung Il Choi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

NIST has supported research characterizing ultrafine particle sources and dynamics for more than a decade. Over 90 % of ultrafine particles (UFP) produced by stovetop cooking on both gas and electric stoves were <10 nm in diameter. Emission rates of up to 1014 min-1 were noted. Coagulation was a dominant removal mechanism and was modeled with some success. Kitchen exhaust fan efficiencies varied from <10 % for particles <5 nm to nearly 100 % for particles >10 nm. Using the NIST test house, penetration coefficients and deposition rates were estimated under real-world conditions for particles in closed-window and open-window configurations. Infiltration factors using dedicated automated air change rate measurements varied from 0.02 for the smallest (<5 nm) particles to >0.5 for larger (30 nm to 100 nm) sizes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
Pages859-864
Number of pages6
Volume2
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2011
Event12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011 - Austin, TX, United States
Duration: Jun 5 2011Jun 10 2011

Other

Other12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011
CountryUnited States
CityAustin, TX
Period6/5/116/10/11

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pollution

Cite this

Wallace, L., Persily, A., Emmerich, S., Rim, D., Chi, H. P., Howard-Reed, C., ... Choi, J. I. (2011). Ultrafine particles: 3 Years of measurements in the NIST test house. In 12th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate 2011 (Vol. 2, pp. 859-864)