Ultrawideband noise synthetic aperture radar: Theory and experiment

Dmitriy Garmatyuk, Ram Mohan Narayanan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors demonstrate the ability of the ultra-wideband random noise radar to be used as a SAR imagery instrument. Experimentation with processing data collected over different angles clearly shows that theoretical cross-range and slant-range resolution are achieved. It was also observed that, due to the waveform structure end 'boom-SAR' geometry, cross-range walk can be a problem, especially in short-range measurements. Special post-processing methods (such as coherent summing sub-arrays of partitioned and separately processed narrower angle data sets) are under investigation to reduce distortions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium
Subtitle of host publicationWireless Technologies and Information Networks, APS 1999 - Held in conjunction with USNC/URSI National Radio Science Meeting
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1764-1767
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)078035639X, 9780780356399
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Event1999 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium, APSURSI 1999 - Orlando, United States
Duration: Jul 11 1999Jul 16 1999

Publication series

NameIEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium: Wireless Technologies and Information Networks, APS 1999 - Held in conjunction with USNC/URSI National Radio Science Meeting
Volume3

Other

Other1999 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society International Symposium, APSURSI 1999
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando
Period7/11/997/16/99

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Instrumentation
  • Radiation

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