Understanding Depressive Symptoms Among Individuals With Spinal Cord Injuries: A Biopsychosocial Perspective

Amber O'Shea, Susan Miller Smedema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between various biopsychosocial factors and depressive symptoms in individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Survey data were collected from 238 individuals with SCIs. The survey measured symptoms of depression, injury level, pain, catastrophizing beliefs, coping skills, perceived stress, and social support. Results indicated that pain (β =.14, p <.05), catastrophizing beliefs (β =.13, p <.05), and perceived stress (β =.50, p <.001) have a positive association with depressive symptoms. Positive coping skills (β = -.16, p <.01) were found to have a negative relationship with depressive symptoms. Injury level (β =.05, ns) and social support (β = -.09, ns) were not found to significantly affect depressive symptoms. The results of the study generally support the biopsychosocial model of depression in individuals with SCIs. Interventions should be aimed at promoting positive coping and ameliorating pain, catastrophizing beliefs, and perceived stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-28
Number of pages9
JournalRehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2014

Fingerprint

Spinal Cord Injuries
Catastrophization
Depression
Psychological Adaptation
Social Support
Wounds and Injuries
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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Understanding Depressive Symptoms Among Individuals With Spinal Cord Injuries : A Biopsychosocial Perspective. / O'Shea, Amber; Smedema, Susan Miller.

In: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Vol. 58, No. 1, 10.2014, p. 20-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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