Understanding missions for engineering outreach and service: How new engineering faculty can learn from past generations of Ph.D.-holding engineers and engineering educators

Catherine G P. Berdanier, Monica Farmer Cox

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Teaching, research, and service are the three "arms" of academic success, especially for new faculty. The roles of teaching and research are relatively concrete in disciplinary standards, but service is more ambiguous. This paper reflects on the service and outreach of prior generations of Ph.D.-holding engineers to more fully interrogate the idea of what service means in the context of being an expert in the field. This paper studies the role of service and outreach in the careers of engineering Ph.D.s in academia and industry through the lens of Golde and Walker's (2006) Stewardship framework. Although service and outreach are not tenets of the three arms of Stewardship as proposed originally by Golde and Walker, we find that they are integral parts of all three tenets of Stewardship. As part of a larger NSF-funded study on the preparation of engineering doctoral students, interview data from 40 Ph.D.-holding engineers in a variety of careers indicate that practicing engineers identify strong linkages between their engineering expertise and outreach, service, and the broader impacts of their work. This research will help to prepare new engineering faculty for the expectations of service based on the paths of prior generations of engineers and engineering educators.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publication122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society
    PublisherAmerican Society for Engineering Education
    StatePublished - 2015
    Event2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition - Seattle, United States
    Duration: Jun 14 2015Jun 17 2015

    Other

    Other2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition
    CountryUnited States
    CitySeattle
    Period6/14/156/17/15

    Fingerprint

    Engineers
    Teaching
    Lenses
    Concretes
    Students
    Industry

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Berdanier, C. G. P., & Cox, M. F. (2015). Understanding missions for engineering outreach and service: How new engineering faculty can learn from past generations of Ph.D.-holding engineers and engineering educators. In 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society American Society for Engineering Education.
    Berdanier, Catherine G P. ; Cox, Monica Farmer. / Understanding missions for engineering outreach and service : How new engineering faculty can learn from past generations of Ph.D.-holding engineers and engineering educators. 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society. American Society for Engineering Education, 2015.
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    Berdanier, CGP & Cox, MF 2015, Understanding missions for engineering outreach and service: How new engineering faculty can learn from past generations of Ph.D.-holding engineers and engineering educators. in 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society. American Society for Engineering Education, 2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Seattle, United States, 6/14/15.

    Understanding missions for engineering outreach and service : How new engineering faculty can learn from past generations of Ph.D.-holding engineers and engineering educators. / Berdanier, Catherine G P.; Cox, Monica Farmer.

    122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society. American Society for Engineering Education, 2015.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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    Berdanier CGP, Cox MF. Understanding missions for engineering outreach and service: How new engineering faculty can learn from past generations of Ph.D.-holding engineers and engineering educators. In 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society. American Society for Engineering Education. 2015