Understanding mutable internet pathogens, or how i learned to stop worrying and love parasitic behavior

Kevin R.B. Butler, Patrick D. McDaniel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Worms are becoming increasingly hostile. The exponential growth of infection rates allows small outbreaks to have worldwide consequences within minutes. Moreover, the collateral damage caused by infections can cripple the entire Internet, While harmful, such behaviors have historically been short-lived. We assert the future holds much more caustic malware. Attacks based on mutation and covert propagation are likely to be ultimately more damaging and long lasting. This assertion is supported by observations of natural systems, where similarly behaving parasites represent by far the most successful class of living creatures. This talk considers a parasite for the Internet, providing biological metaphors for its behavior and demonstrating the structure of pathogens. Through simulation, we show that even with low infection rates, a mutating pathogen will eventually infect an entire community. We posit the inevitability of such parasites and consider ways that they can be mitigated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInformation Systems Security - First International Conference, ICISS 2005, Proceedings
Pages36-48
Number of pages13
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event1st International Conference on Information Systems Security, ICISS 2005 - Kolkata, India
Duration: Dec 19 2005Dec 21 2005

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume3803 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other1st International Conference on Information Systems Security, ICISS 2005
CountryIndia
CityKolkata
Period12/19/0512/21/05

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

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