Understanding public support for, or opposition to, the use of consumer racial profiling to identify shoplifters

Shaun L. Gabbidon, Tatiyana Laws

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Scholars have recently begun developing an emerging body of public opinion scholarship on consumer racial profiling (CRP) - the use of racial/ethnic profiling as a primary tactic to identify shoplifters. The existing scholarship has primarily explored the key predictors of support for the use of CRP. Lacking within the literature, however, has been a study that examines the specifics as to why the public supports or opposes CRP. This study explores this question by relying on open-ended responses solicited through the 2012 Penn State Poll. The findings revealed that supporters of CRP believed the practice was effective, that it was justified on the basis of shoplifting statistics and that the cost of shoplifting losses to retail establishments justified its use. Opponents of the use of CRP rejected its use based on the belief that it relied on stereotypes, was ineffective and unconstitutional. The implications of these results are considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-422
Number of pages14
JournalSecurity Journal
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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public support
opposition
Statistics
shoplifting
Costs
tactics
public opinion
stereotype
statistics
Racial profiling
Public support
costs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Safety Research
  • Strategy and Management
  • Law

Cite this

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abstract = "Scholars have recently begun developing an emerging body of public opinion scholarship on consumer racial profiling (CRP) - the use of racial/ethnic profiling as a primary tactic to identify shoplifters. The existing scholarship has primarily explored the key predictors of support for the use of CRP. Lacking within the literature, however, has been a study that examines the specifics as to why the public supports or opposes CRP. This study explores this question by relying on open-ended responses solicited through the 2012 Penn State Poll. The findings revealed that supporters of CRP believed the practice was effective, that it was justified on the basis of shoplifting statistics and that the cost of shoplifting losses to retail establishments justified its use. Opponents of the use of CRP rejected its use based on the belief that it relied on stereotypes, was ineffective and unconstitutional. The implications of these results are considered.",
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Understanding public support for, or opposition to, the use of consumer racial profiling to identify shoplifters. / Gabbidon, Shaun L.; Laws, Tatiyana.

In: Security Journal, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.07.2016, p. 409-422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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