Understanding subtle sexism: Detection and use of sexist language

Janet K. Swim, Robyn Mallett, Charles Stangor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the present research we examined the association between Modern Sexist beliefs and identifying and engaging in subtle sexist behavior. In Study 1, we found that those who endorsed Modern Sexist beliefs were less likely to detect the occurrence of normative sexist behavior (i.e., the use of sexist language), and this oversight was a function of their failure to define such behavior as sexist. In Study 2, we found that those who endorsed Modern Sexist beliefs were more likely to use sexist language and less likely to use nonsexist language. Use of nonsexist language was a function of personal definitions of sexist language. Results are discussed in terms of motivations to self-correct discriminatory behavior and conceptualizations of current forms of sexism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-128
Number of pages12
JournalSex Roles
Volume51
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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