Understanding the efficiency of autonomous nano- and microscale motors

Wei Wang, Tso Yi Chiang, Darrell Velegol, Thomas E. Mallouk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We analyze the power conversion efficiency of different classes of autonomous nano- and micromotors. For bimetallic catalytic motors that operate by a self-electrophoretic mechanism, there are four stages of energy loss, and together they result in a power conversion efficiency on the order of 10 -9. The results of finite element modeling agree well with experimental measurements of the efficiency of catalytic Pt-Au nanorod motors. Modifications of the composition and shape of bimetallic catalytic motors were predicted computationally and found experimentally to lead to higher efficiency. The efficiencies of bubble-propelled catalytic micromotors, magnetically driven flagellar motors, Janus micromotors driven by self-generated thermal gradients, and ultrasonically driven metallic micromotors are also analyzed and discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10557-10565
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume135
Issue number28
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 17 2013

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Micromotors
Nanotubes
Hot Temperature
Conversion efficiency
Nanorods
Thermal gradients
Energy dissipation
Chemical analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Wang, Wei ; Chiang, Tso Yi ; Velegol, Darrell ; Mallouk, Thomas E. / Understanding the efficiency of autonomous nano- and microscale motors. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2013 ; Vol. 135, No. 28. pp. 10557-10565.
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Understanding the efficiency of autonomous nano- and microscale motors. / Wang, Wei; Chiang, Tso Yi; Velegol, Darrell; Mallouk, Thomas E.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 135, No. 28, 17.07.2013, p. 10557-10565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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