Understanding the Parent-Child Relationship during the Transition into College and Emerging Adulthood Using the Relational Turbulence Theory

Emily Scheinfeld, Timothy Worley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Emerging adulthood presents individuals with increased levels of relational uncertainty, perceived interference, and feelings of conflict or turbulence, especially within the parent-child dyad as children enter emerging adulthood. This study argues the relationship turbulence theory provides a framework to examine parent-child dyads experiencing the transition into adulthood. One hundred and forty-three emerging adults reported on their relationship with a parent, as well as recent interactions with their parent. Structural equation modeling demonstrated the relational turbulence theory is generalizable to parent-child contexts. Further explanation of these results and possible implications of the study are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-462
Number of pages19
JournalCommunication Quarterly
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 8 2018

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parent-child relationship
adulthood
parents
Turbulence
dyad
interference
uncertainty
interaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

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