Undoing solitary urban design: A review of risk factors and mental health outcomes associated with living in social isolation

Kevin Bennett, Tyler Gualtieri, Becky Kazmierczyk

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Abstract

Social isolation in cities is a growing epidemic. The percentage of American adults who say they are lonely has doubled since the 1980s from 20 percent to 40 percent (Anderson, 2010). According to a 2013 survey conducted by ComRes on behalf of Radio 2 and BBC Local Radio, 52% of Londoners feel lonely. The growing problem of isolation in cities belies intuitive thinking. Metropolitan areas often regarded as centers of culture and commerce teeming with people who all crave a sense of connectedness. The reality for many is that cities provide an overwhelming sense of anxiety driven in part by the dense crowds of anonymous strangers that constantly surround us.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Urban Design and Mental Health
Volume1
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2018

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