Unique associations between peer relations and social anxiety in early adolescence

Kelly S. Flanagan, Stephen A. Erath, Karen Linn Bierman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the unique associations between feelings of social anxiety and multiple dimensions of peer relations (positive peer nominations, peer- and self-reported peer victimization, and self-reported friendship quality) among 383 sixth- and seventh-grade students. Hierarchical regression analysis provided evidence for the unique contribution made by peer relations to social anxiety above that made by adolescents' individual vulnerabilities (i.e., teacher ratings of social behavior, self-reported social appraisals assessed by hypothetical vignettes). Two subgroups of socially anxious adolescents - those with and without peer problems - were distinguished by their social behavior but not their social appraisals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)759-769
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2008

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Social Behavior
Anxiety
Crime Victims
Emotions
Regression Analysis
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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Unique associations between peer relations and social anxiety in early adolescence. / Flanagan, Kelly S.; Erath, Stephen A.; Bierman, Karen Linn.

In: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.10.2008, p. 759-769.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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