Unrealistic optimism in internet events

Jamonn Campbell, Nathan Michael Greenauer, Kristin Macaluso, Christian End

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study assessed the tendency for individuals to be unrealistically optimistic about internet related activities. Ninety-seven participants estimated their chances of experiencing 31 positive and negative internet events compared to the average student at their school. The data indicated that students believed positive internet events were more likely to happen to them and negative events were less likely to happen to them compared to the average student. Heavy internet users reported more optimistic responses than did light users. Perceptions of event characteristics (controllability, desirability, and personal experience) were also significantly correlated with optimistic bias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1273-1284
Number of pages12
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

Fingerprint

Internet
Students
Controllability
Light
Optimism
World Wide Web

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Campbell, Jamonn ; Greenauer, Nathan Michael ; Macaluso, Kristin ; End, Christian. / Unrealistic optimism in internet events. In: Computers in Human Behavior. 2007 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 1273-1284.
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Unrealistic optimism in internet events. / Campbell, Jamonn; Greenauer, Nathan Michael; Macaluso, Kristin; End, Christian.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.04.2007, p. 1273-1284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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