Unsilencing Critical Conversations in Social-Studies Teacher Education using Agent-based Modeling

Andrew Hostetler, Pratim Sengupta, Tyler S. Hollett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, we argue that when complex sociopolitical issues such as ethnocentrism and racial segregation are represented as complex, emergent systems using agent-based computational models (in short agent-based models or ABMs), discourse about these representations can disrupt social studies teacher candidates' dispositions of teaching social studies without engaging in critical conversations about race and power. Our study extends the literature on agent-based computing to the domain of social studies education, and demonstrates how preservice teachers' participation in agent-based modeling activities can help them adopt a more critical stance toward designing learning activities for their future classrooms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-170
Number of pages32
JournalCognition and Instruction
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2018

Fingerprint

social studies
Systems Analysis
Teaching
conversation
Learning
Education
teacher
job creation measure
ethnocentrism
education
disposition
segregation
candidacy
classroom
participation
discourse
learning
Power (Psychology)
Teacher Training
Social Segregation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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Unsilencing Critical Conversations in Social-Studies Teacher Education using Agent-based Modeling. / Hostetler, Andrew; Sengupta, Pratim; Hollett, Tyler S.

In: Cognition and Instruction, Vol. 36, No. 2, 03.04.2018, p. 139-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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