Unsteady RAH-66 Comanche flowfield simulations including fan-in-fin

Emre Alpman, Lyle N. Long

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Understanding the dynamic relationship between the antitorque moment thrust and the applied collective pitch angle is crucial, especially for directional control sensitivity analyses. Although there are many studies in the literature on the steady state behavior of the FANTAIL™, little is known about the transient response and thrust build up, which is the primary focus of this paper. Computational fluid dynamics is used for the solutions here, because it provides a more complete flowfield prediction, especially in low-power, near edge-wise conditions. The flowfield is assumed to be inviscid and the Euler equations are solved with a blade element model for the FANTAIL™. The main rotor is excluded in this study. Solutions are obtained by modifying the computer code PUMA2 (Parallel Unstructured Maritime Aerodynamics), and using an unstructured grid of 2.8 million cells. It was run on the Beowulf clusters COCOA2 and COCOA3. Dynamic fan thrust and moment response to applied collective pitch in hover and forward flight are presented and discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication16th AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference
StatePublished - Dec 1 2003
Event16th AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference 2003 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Jun 23 2003Jun 26 2003

Publication series

Name16th AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference

Other

Other16th AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference 2003
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period6/23/036/26/03

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Automotive Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

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