Updated systematic review of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy for treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome

Michael Friedman, Meghan N. Wilson, Hsin Ching Lin, Hsueh Wen Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

233 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Perform an updated systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the cure rate of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Methods: A systematic review was performed to identify English-language studies that evaluate the treatment of pediatric (age < 20 years) OSAHS patients with T&A using polysomnography as a metric of cure. Twenty-three studies fit the inclusion criteria and a meta-analysis was performed to determine the overall success. Meta-analysis was also performed to determine the success in obese and comorbid populations vs cohorts of healthy children. Results: The meta-analysis included 1079 subjects (mean sample size of 42 patients) with a mean age of 6.5 years. The effect measure was the percentage of pediatric patients with OSAHS who were successfully treated (k = 22 studies) with T&A based on preoperative and postoperative PSG data. Random-effects model estimated the treatment success of T&A was 66.3 percent, when cure was defined per each individual study. When "cure" was defined as an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of <1 (k = 9 studies), random-effects model estimate for OSAHS treatment success with T&A was 59.8 percent. Postoperative mean AHI was significantly decreased from preoperative levels. Conclusions: Contrary to popular belief, meta-analysis of current literature demonstrates that pediatric sleep apnea is often not cured by T&A. Although complete resolution is not achieved in most cases, T&A still offers significant improvements in AHI, making it a valuable first-line treatment for pediatric OSAHS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)800-808
Number of pages9
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume140
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

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Adenoidectomy
Tonsillectomy
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Pediatrics
Meta-Analysis
Apnea
Therapeutics
Polysomnography
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Sample Size
Language

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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title = "Updated systematic review of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy for treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome",
abstract = "Objective: Perform an updated systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the cure rate of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Methods: A systematic review was performed to identify English-language studies that evaluate the treatment of pediatric (age < 20 years) OSAHS patients with T&A using polysomnography as a metric of cure. Twenty-three studies fit the inclusion criteria and a meta-analysis was performed to determine the overall success. Meta-analysis was also performed to determine the success in obese and comorbid populations vs cohorts of healthy children. Results: The meta-analysis included 1079 subjects (mean sample size of 42 patients) with a mean age of 6.5 years. The effect measure was the percentage of pediatric patients with OSAHS who were successfully treated (k = 22 studies) with T&A based on preoperative and postoperative PSG data. Random-effects model estimated the treatment success of T&A was 66.3 percent, when cure was defined per each individual study. When {"}cure{"} was defined as an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of <1 (k = 9 studies), random-effects model estimate for OSAHS treatment success with T&A was 59.8 percent. Postoperative mean AHI was significantly decreased from preoperative levels. Conclusions: Contrary to popular belief, meta-analysis of current literature demonstrates that pediatric sleep apnea is often not cured by T&A. Although complete resolution is not achieved in most cases, T&A still offers significant improvements in AHI, making it a valuable first-line treatment for pediatric OSAHS.",
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Updated systematic review of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy for treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. / Friedman, Michael; Wilson, Meghan N.; Lin, Hsin Ching; Chang, Hsueh Wen.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 140, No. 6, 01.06.2009, p. 800-808.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Updated systematic review of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy for treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome

AU - Friedman, Michael

AU - Wilson, Meghan N.

AU - Lin, Hsin Ching

AU - Chang, Hsueh Wen

PY - 2009/6/1

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N2 - Objective: Perform an updated systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the cure rate of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Methods: A systematic review was performed to identify English-language studies that evaluate the treatment of pediatric (age < 20 years) OSAHS patients with T&A using polysomnography as a metric of cure. Twenty-three studies fit the inclusion criteria and a meta-analysis was performed to determine the overall success. Meta-analysis was also performed to determine the success in obese and comorbid populations vs cohorts of healthy children. Results: The meta-analysis included 1079 subjects (mean sample size of 42 patients) with a mean age of 6.5 years. The effect measure was the percentage of pediatric patients with OSAHS who were successfully treated (k = 22 studies) with T&A based on preoperative and postoperative PSG data. Random-effects model estimated the treatment success of T&A was 66.3 percent, when cure was defined per each individual study. When "cure" was defined as an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of <1 (k = 9 studies), random-effects model estimate for OSAHS treatment success with T&A was 59.8 percent. Postoperative mean AHI was significantly decreased from preoperative levels. Conclusions: Contrary to popular belief, meta-analysis of current literature demonstrates that pediatric sleep apnea is often not cured by T&A. Although complete resolution is not achieved in most cases, T&A still offers significant improvements in AHI, making it a valuable first-line treatment for pediatric OSAHS.

AB - Objective: Perform an updated systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the cure rate of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Methods: A systematic review was performed to identify English-language studies that evaluate the treatment of pediatric (age < 20 years) OSAHS patients with T&A using polysomnography as a metric of cure. Twenty-three studies fit the inclusion criteria and a meta-analysis was performed to determine the overall success. Meta-analysis was also performed to determine the success in obese and comorbid populations vs cohorts of healthy children. Results: The meta-analysis included 1079 subjects (mean sample size of 42 patients) with a mean age of 6.5 years. The effect measure was the percentage of pediatric patients with OSAHS who were successfully treated (k = 22 studies) with T&A based on preoperative and postoperative PSG data. Random-effects model estimated the treatment success of T&A was 66.3 percent, when cure was defined per each individual study. When "cure" was defined as an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of <1 (k = 9 studies), random-effects model estimate for OSAHS treatment success with T&A was 59.8 percent. Postoperative mean AHI was significantly decreased from preoperative levels. Conclusions: Contrary to popular belief, meta-analysis of current literature demonstrates that pediatric sleep apnea is often not cured by T&A. Although complete resolution is not achieved in most cases, T&A still offers significant improvements in AHI, making it a valuable first-line treatment for pediatric OSAHS.

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