Upsetting the balance beam: System integrative photovoltaics as purposeful manipulation of energy demand and microclimate in the built environment

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Knowledge of the local solar resource and the goals of the desired structure can inform the process for energy conversion systems to be integrated into building systems in a purposeful manner for the lifetime of use-coined System Integrative Photovoltaics (SIPV). We show that the original Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) concept has become brittle with lack of exploration. The apparent goals of BIPV are to reduce fixed costs of installation and materials for photovoltaic modules by integrating them into the building envelope, but the mechanism or process for this integration has been largely absent. This strategy has led to a misinterpretation that one may simply replace the façade with PV elements. From a SIPV design criteria, solar technology implementation can enhance sustainable building practices by acknowledged boundaries for thermal exchange in addition to power conversion. The resources are available to address the system-surrounding interface via microclimate modification, which affects performance of both the PV and the envelope. Here, new design and engineering cases are compared for the next wave of photovoltaic integration with the built environment. Four studies are contrasted for residential integrative PV systems. These include the MorningStar Pennsylvania from the 2007 Solar Decathlon; Kieren Timberlake Architects' (KTA) Cellophane House installation for the MOMA in 2009; Darmstadt's SurPLUS house for the 2009 Solar Decathlon; and finally Penn State's Natural Fusion Green Roof Integrated Photovoltaic (GRIPV) approach for the 2009 Solar Decathlon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010
Pages4041-4080
Number of pages40
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
Event39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010 - Phoenix, AZ, United States
Duration: May 17 2010May 22 2010

Publication series

Name39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010
Volume5

Other

Other39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010
CountryUnited States
CityPhoenix, AZ
Period5/17/105/22/10

Fingerprint

Cellophane
Energy conversion
Roofs
Fusion reactions
Costs
Hot Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment

Cite this

Brownson, J. R. S., & Iulo, L. D. (2010). Upsetting the balance beam: System integrative photovoltaics as purposeful manipulation of energy demand and microclimate in the built environment. In 39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010 (pp. 4041-4080). (39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010; Vol. 5).
Brownson, Jeffrey R.S. ; Iulo, Lisa D. / Upsetting the balance beam : System integrative photovoltaics as purposeful manipulation of energy demand and microclimate in the built environment. 39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010. 2010. pp. 4041-4080 (39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010).
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Brownson, JRS & Iulo, LD 2010, Upsetting the balance beam: System integrative photovoltaics as purposeful manipulation of energy demand and microclimate in the built environment. in 39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010. 39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010, vol. 5, pp. 4041-4080, 39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010, Phoenix, AZ, United States, 5/17/10.

Upsetting the balance beam : System integrative photovoltaics as purposeful manipulation of energy demand and microclimate in the built environment. / Brownson, Jeffrey R.S.; Iulo, Lisa D.

39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010. 2010. p. 4041-4080 (39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010; Vol. 5).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Brownson JRS, Iulo LD. Upsetting the balance beam: System integrative photovoltaics as purposeful manipulation of energy demand and microclimate in the built environment. In 39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010. 2010. p. 4041-4080. (39th ASES National Solar Conference 2010, SOLAR 2010).