Urban Power and Community Development in the 'World Risk Society'

Post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans (USA)

David McBride

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines urban power and community movements when a city is consumed by a major disaster. Using New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina as its case study, this investigation will identify discriminatory police practices, public-private development policies, and ethnopolitical leadership that reproduced historic racial and class inequality in post-Katrina New Orleans. This study will argue that it was not so-called disaster capitalism, but automatic or "reflexive" re-development (Ulrich Beck' s concept) that revived the city' s traditional racial caste and structural class stratification. Finally, this policy mix in disaster response initiatives overshadowed specific strategies and goals for rebuilding advocated by community-based movements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-142
Number of pages15
JournalPerspectives on Global Development and Technology
Volume15
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Urban Renewal
world society
Cyclonic Storms
Social Planning
risk society
Disasters
community development
hurricane
disaster
Capitalism
caste
Policy Making
Private Practice
Police
redevelopment
capitalism
Social Class
leadership
development policy
community

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Education
  • Development
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Urban Power and Community Development in the 'World Risk Society' : Post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans (USA). / McBride, David.

In: Perspectives on Global Development and Technology, Vol. 15, No. 1-2, 01.01.2016, p. 128-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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