Use of a publicly available database to determine the impact of diabetes on length of hospital stay for elective orthopedic procedures in California

David Kerr, Meroe Yadollahi, Hemerson M. Bautista, Xin Chen, Shuyan Dong, Stephane Guerrier, Remmert J. Laan, Ian Duncan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In California, 1 in 3 hospital beds are occupied by adults with diabetes. The aim of this study was to examine whether diabetes impacts length of stay (LOS) following common elective orthopedic procedures compared to nondiabetic individuals, and also the performance of hospitals across California for these procedures. Using the Public Use California Patient Discharge Data Files for 2010-2012, the authors examined LOS for elective discharges for hip, spine, or knee surgery (n = 318,861) from the total population of all discharges (n = 11,476,073) for 309 hospitals across California. In all, 16% of discharges had a codiagnosis of diabetes. Unadjusted average LOS was 3.11 days without and 3.40 days with diabetes (mean difference 0.29 [95% confidence interval (0.27, 0.31) days, P < 0.01]). After adjusting for covariates, diabetes no longer resulted in a significant difference in LOS. However, the presence of common comorbidities did significantly impact LOS. Average LOS for patients with diabetes also varied widely by hospital, ranging between -50% and +100% of the mean LOS for all hospitals. Diabetes does not prolong LOS after orthopedic procedures unless comorbidities are present. Nevertheless, across California there is significant variation in LOS between individual hospitals, which may inform the decision-making process for prospective patients and payers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)439-444
Number of pages6
JournalPopulation Health Management
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Orthopedic Procedures
Length of Stay
Databases
Comorbidity
Patient Discharge
Information Storage and Retrieval
Hip
Knee
Decision Making
Spine
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Leadership and Management
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Kerr, David ; Yadollahi, Meroe ; Bautista, Hemerson M. ; Chen, Xin ; Dong, Shuyan ; Guerrier, Stephane ; Laan, Remmert J. ; Duncan, Ian. / Use of a publicly available database to determine the impact of diabetes on length of hospital stay for elective orthopedic procedures in California. In: Population Health Management. 2016 ; Vol. 19, No. 6. pp. 439-444.
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abstract = "In California, 1 in 3 hospital beds are occupied by adults with diabetes. The aim of this study was to examine whether diabetes impacts length of stay (LOS) following common elective orthopedic procedures compared to nondiabetic individuals, and also the performance of hospitals across California for these procedures. Using the Public Use California Patient Discharge Data Files for 2010-2012, the authors examined LOS for elective discharges for hip, spine, or knee surgery (n = 318,861) from the total population of all discharges (n = 11,476,073) for 309 hospitals across California. In all, 16{\%} of discharges had a codiagnosis of diabetes. Unadjusted average LOS was 3.11 days without and 3.40 days with diabetes (mean difference 0.29 [95{\%} confidence interval (0.27, 0.31) days, P < 0.01]). After adjusting for covariates, diabetes no longer resulted in a significant difference in LOS. However, the presence of common comorbidities did significantly impact LOS. Average LOS for patients with diabetes also varied widely by hospital, ranging between -50{\%} and +100{\%} of the mean LOS for all hospitals. Diabetes does not prolong LOS after orthopedic procedures unless comorbidities are present. Nevertheless, across California there is significant variation in LOS between individual hospitals, which may inform the decision-making process for prospective patients and payers.",
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Use of a publicly available database to determine the impact of diabetes on length of hospital stay for elective orthopedic procedures in California. / Kerr, David; Yadollahi, Meroe; Bautista, Hemerson M.; Chen, Xin; Dong, Shuyan; Guerrier, Stephane; Laan, Remmert J.; Duncan, Ian.

In: Population Health Management, Vol. 19, No. 6, 01.12.2016, p. 439-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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