Use of advanced fuel injection strategies for emissions reduction in diesel engines

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Emissions reduction in diesel engines can be achieved through a number of advanced combustion strategies, including multiple fuel injections and fuel injection rate shaping techniques. These fuel injection strategies reduce emissions, including soot, NOx, and unburned hydrocarbons, by manipulating fuel/air mixtures and local equivalence ratios, local temperatures and cylinder pressure, as well as overall combustion phasing. This work seeks to describe the mechanisms by which multiple injection strategies reduce unburned hydrocarbons at low-temperature combustion conditions. The results show that unburned hydrocarbon emissions are reduced when multiple injections are used, and when combustion timing is thermodynamically favorable. Although multiple injection strategies can reduce unburned hydrocarbons at thermodynamically unfavorable timings, when injection occurs during the expansion stroke, the multiple injections are less effective at these conditions. The results indicate that both mixture preparation and thermal conditions have a significant effect on emissions. Future directions of research for internal combustion engines and turbulent reacting flows in general are outlined to address the challenges associated with predicting emissions from highly unsteady reacting flows.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Event2016 Spring Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute, ESSCI 2016 - Princeton, United States
Duration: Mar 13 2016Mar 16 2016

Other

Other2016 Spring Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute, ESSCI 2016
CountryUnited States
CityPrinceton
Period3/13/163/16/16

Fingerprint

fuel injection
diesel engines
Fuel injection
Hydrocarbons
Diesel engines
injection
hydrocarbons
reacting flow
Soot
Unsteady flow
Engine cylinders
Internal combustion engines
time measurement
Turbulent flow
internal combustion engines
soot
strokes
Temperature
equivalence
Air

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

O'Connor, J. A. (2016). Use of advanced fuel injection strategies for emissions reduction in diesel engines. Paper presented at 2016 Spring Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute, ESSCI 2016, Princeton, United States.
O'Connor, Jacqueline Antonia. / Use of advanced fuel injection strategies for emissions reduction in diesel engines. Paper presented at 2016 Spring Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute, ESSCI 2016, Princeton, United States.
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abstract = "Emissions reduction in diesel engines can be achieved through a number of advanced combustion strategies, including multiple fuel injections and fuel injection rate shaping techniques. These fuel injection strategies reduce emissions, including soot, NOx, and unburned hydrocarbons, by manipulating fuel/air mixtures and local equivalence ratios, local temperatures and cylinder pressure, as well as overall combustion phasing. This work seeks to describe the mechanisms by which multiple injection strategies reduce unburned hydrocarbons at low-temperature combustion conditions. The results show that unburned hydrocarbon emissions are reduced when multiple injections are used, and when combustion timing is thermodynamically favorable. Although multiple injection strategies can reduce unburned hydrocarbons at thermodynamically unfavorable timings, when injection occurs during the expansion stroke, the multiple injections are less effective at these conditions. The results indicate that both mixture preparation and thermal conditions have a significant effect on emissions. Future directions of research for internal combustion engines and turbulent reacting flows in general are outlined to address the challenges associated with predicting emissions from highly unsteady reacting flows.",
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O'Connor, JA 2016, 'Use of advanced fuel injection strategies for emissions reduction in diesel engines' Paper presented at 2016 Spring Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute, ESSCI 2016, Princeton, United States, 3/13/16 - 3/16/16, .

Use of advanced fuel injection strategies for emissions reduction in diesel engines. / O'Connor, Jacqueline Antonia.

2016. Paper presented at 2016 Spring Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute, ESSCI 2016, Princeton, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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N2 - Emissions reduction in diesel engines can be achieved through a number of advanced combustion strategies, including multiple fuel injections and fuel injection rate shaping techniques. These fuel injection strategies reduce emissions, including soot, NOx, and unburned hydrocarbons, by manipulating fuel/air mixtures and local equivalence ratios, local temperatures and cylinder pressure, as well as overall combustion phasing. This work seeks to describe the mechanisms by which multiple injection strategies reduce unburned hydrocarbons at low-temperature combustion conditions. The results show that unburned hydrocarbon emissions are reduced when multiple injections are used, and when combustion timing is thermodynamically favorable. Although multiple injection strategies can reduce unburned hydrocarbons at thermodynamically unfavorable timings, when injection occurs during the expansion stroke, the multiple injections are less effective at these conditions. The results indicate that both mixture preparation and thermal conditions have a significant effect on emissions. Future directions of research for internal combustion engines and turbulent reacting flows in general are outlined to address the challenges associated with predicting emissions from highly unsteady reacting flows.

AB - Emissions reduction in diesel engines can be achieved through a number of advanced combustion strategies, including multiple fuel injections and fuel injection rate shaping techniques. These fuel injection strategies reduce emissions, including soot, NOx, and unburned hydrocarbons, by manipulating fuel/air mixtures and local equivalence ratios, local temperatures and cylinder pressure, as well as overall combustion phasing. This work seeks to describe the mechanisms by which multiple injection strategies reduce unburned hydrocarbons at low-temperature combustion conditions. The results show that unburned hydrocarbon emissions are reduced when multiple injections are used, and when combustion timing is thermodynamically favorable. Although multiple injection strategies can reduce unburned hydrocarbons at thermodynamically unfavorable timings, when injection occurs during the expansion stroke, the multiple injections are less effective at these conditions. The results indicate that both mixture preparation and thermal conditions have a significant effect on emissions. Future directions of research for internal combustion engines and turbulent reacting flows in general are outlined to address the challenges associated with predicting emissions from highly unsteady reacting flows.

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O'Connor JA. Use of advanced fuel injection strategies for emissions reduction in diesel engines. 2016. Paper presented at 2016 Spring Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute, ESSCI 2016, Princeton, United States.