Use of Pooled Time Series in the Study of Naturally Occurring Clinical Events and Problem Behavior in a Foster Care Setting

Kevin J. Moore, D. Wayne Osgood, Robert E. Larzelere, Patricia Chamberlain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pooled time series is an underused analytic technique with the potential to increase researchers' ability to exploit clinical data. This article demonstrates the value of pooled time series by analyzing the behavior of youths in a specialized foster care treatment setting in response to a naturally occurring clinical event: changes in the number of youths living together in a treatment foster care setting. Pooled time series moves beyond typical clinical analyses with an increased capability of controlling statistically for complex within-subject effects and with a clinically useful measure of effect size. The complexity of the intrasubject data made it virtually impossible to determine the relevant significance (i.e., clinical meaning) of the clinical event by the use of standard n = 1 visual analysis procedures or standard statistical methods (e.g., chi square). After things such as autocorrelation and individual time trends were statistically controlled, each additional youth increased the number of problematic behaviors by one behavior per youth per day on the Parent Daily Report.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)718-728
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1994

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Aptitude
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Problem Behavior
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Moore, Kevin J. ; Osgood, D. Wayne ; Larzelere, Robert E. ; Chamberlain, Patricia. / Use of Pooled Time Series in the Study of Naturally Occurring Clinical Events and Problem Behavior in a Foster Care Setting. In: Journal of consulting and clinical psychology. 1994 ; Vol. 62, No. 4. pp. 718-728.
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Use of Pooled Time Series in the Study of Naturally Occurring Clinical Events and Problem Behavior in a Foster Care Setting. / Moore, Kevin J.; Osgood, D. Wayne; Larzelere, Robert E.; Chamberlain, Patricia.

In: Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, Vol. 62, No. 4, 08.1994, p. 718-728.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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