Use of positron emission tomography and evoked potentials in the detection of cortical afferents from the gastrointestinal tract

Robin D. Rothstein, Mark Stecker, Martin Reivich, Abass Alavi, Xin Sheng Ding, Jurg Jaggi, Joel Greenberg, Ann Ouyang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Positron emission tomography permits precision identification of the cerebral regions involved in physiologic functions. As the cerebral localization for visceral sensation has not been identified, our aim was to examine the cerebral viscerotopic representation for rectal sensation. Methods: Cerebral-evoked potentials were measured in five healthy volunteers who underwent rectal balloon distension. Simultaneously, cerebral blood flow was measured using positron emission tomography with 15H2O. Results: A cerebral-evoked potential occurred with rectal balloon distension. An increase in cerebral blood flow was noted in the pre- and postcentral gyrus and the thalamus. Conclusion: The techniques for measuring cerebral-evoked potentials and cortical blood flow are useful in the delineation of the cerebral regions subserving visceral sensation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2372-2376
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume91
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1996

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

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