Use of social media in graduate-level medical humanities education: Two pilot studies from Penn State College of Medicine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Social media strategies in education have gained attention for undergraduate students, but there has been relatively little application with graduate populations in medicine. Aims: To use and evaluate the integration of new social media tools into the curricula of two graduate-level medical humanities electives offered to 4th-year students at Penn State College of Medicine. Methods: Instructors selected five social media tools Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, blogging and Skype to promote student learning. At the conclusion of each course, students provided quantitative and qualitative course evaluation. Results: Students gave high favourability ratings to both courses, and expressed that the integration of social media into coursework augmented learning and collaboration. Others identified challenges including: demands on time, concerns about privacy and lack of facility with technology. Integrating social media tools into class activities appeared to offer manifold benefits over traditional classroom methods, including real-time communication outside of the classroom, connecting with medical experts, collaborative opportunities and enhanced creativity. Conclusions: Social media can augment learning opportunities within humanities curriculum in medical schools, and help students acquire tools and skill-sets for problem solving, networking, and collaboration. Command of technologies will be increasingly important to the practice of medicine in the twenty-first century.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e429-e434
JournalMedical teacher
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

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