Use of spatial sensemaking practices in spatial learning

Abha Vaishampayan, Julia Plummer, Patricia Udomprasert, Susan Sunbury

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper describes an approach to understanding how 11-12-year-old students (N=185) engage in spatial thinking through use of sensemaking practices. There is limited research on nature of students’ spatial thinking when learning discipline-specific content knowledge during classroom instruction. We use embodied cognition to examine the kinds of sensemaking practices students use when applying perspective-taking skill to learn seasons and lunar phases, and the teacher’s role in shaping those practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationA Wide Lens
Subtitle of host publicationCombining Embodied, Enactive, Extended, and Embedded Learning in Collaborative Settings - 13th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL 2019 - Conference Proceedings
EditorsKristine Lund, Gerald P. Niccolai, Elise Lavoue, Cindy Hmelo-Silver, Gahgene Gweon, Michael Baker
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages887-888
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9781732467248
StatePublished - 2019
Event13th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning - A Wide Lens: Combining Embodied, Enactive, Extended, and Embedded Learning in Collaborative Settings, CSCL 2019 - Lyon, France
Duration: Jun 17 2019Jun 21 2019

Publication series

NameComputer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1573-4552

Conference

Conference13th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning - A Wide Lens: Combining Embodied, Enactive, Extended, and Embedded Learning in Collaborative Settings, CSCL 2019
CountryFrance
CityLyon
Period6/17/196/21/19

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Education

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